GalleyCat AppNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Your Twitter Chat Is Stressing Me Out

twitter logoTwitter is stressing me out. It all culminated this weekend when I wanted to waste some time on an Amtrak train, but couldn’t focus. The journo chatter was too loud. Jacob Harris seemed to understand me:

But while he seemed ambivalent about the noise, it was making me properly anxious. Not only is the conference streaming in my feed, but then you’re having inter-conference #chats, too. Of course, this could be a personal problem. I’ll disclose that because of some family matters, I’ve had to take a step back from being plugged in 24 hours a day. Since I’m not forced to post, write, or respond to news like I normally do, maybe the noisiness is more obvious to me. I can’t use it right now, therefore it is meaningless. That might be too easy of an out.

The thing is, we journalists talk too much. I like following Twitter chats — #mucked up or #wjchat — until I actually follow them. At some point in refreshing my feed and discerning what you’re trying to say about advertising and wearables in your MT of a RT of an A1 to Q2 I give up and go see what @unfoRETTAble is watching. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Everything Upworthy Can Teach Journalists

upworthyThis week, New York magazine has a profile of the website we all love to hate: Upworthy.

Upworthy is the bane of many a journalist’s existence. It peddles in clicks, and has people sharing, painlessly and by the millions, pieces of content that concern topics we actually want to report on. A 10-page feature or package with video on the effects of poverty takes months to prepare and weeks to garner attention on Twitter. They find one video on the topic and it has thousands of views. It’s  more BuzzFeed-y than BuzzFeed; they at least have a news team. You should read the whole piece, though, because there are lessons to be gleaned from their success.

1) Ah, the infamous Upworthy style headline. In one part of the feature, they talk about ‘click testing,’ where they run through possible headlines and then see how clickable they are out in the wild. If it’s not clickable, they tweak. Every media outlet can do this, and if you want to garner more traffic, you should. If you feel icky about changing the headline after it’s originally published, just add a note. I see good digital outlets doing this all the time. Slate stories, for example, often have one headline when I see it in the morning and another by the afternoon when I actually get around to reading it. If it requires emails or write offs to tweak a headline or re-run and write a new social media tease to make it more interesting — you’re doing it wrong. Read more

Gearing Up For SXSWi: How to Organize Your Online Presence With RebelMouse

5480020f0cbc7867c4dd1cc1d6839498cfd22e6443be3d3885fc60878062a841Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, WordPress, LinkedIn — sometimes it’s just all too much to keep up with, especially when you’re reporting for your publication remotely and expected to keep social media followers in the loop. And with 30,000 people in the media and technology industries descending on Austin this weekend (March 7-11, more specifically) to recount the mass knowledge dump and hundreds of sessions that comprise SXSW Interactive, social reporting from the field can feel impossible.

That’s where RebelMouse comes in.

If you’re struggling to organize your digital presence and find it stressful to bounce back and forth across a dozen social media platforms, download the app ASAP.

RebelMouse’s purpose is pretty simple. The iOS app allows you to manage all of your social media handles in one spot and in real-time while you’re on assignment, and all of your feeds are updated from a pretty, personalized RebelMouse website. You can use the app’s free offering or pay more for features like enhanced branding and access to Google analytics. While it was developed to help local businesses save time on posting social updates and serve as an alternative to building an expensive website, I’m convinced RebelMouse’s main function (aggregating) is the key to making the life of a reporter and publisher easier.

Read more

Steve Buttry Wants to Change How You Work (It Will Be Better, We Promise)

project unboltMost of our newsrooms, if we’re honest, are print organizations with the digital initiative “bolted on.” Or so admitted Digital First Media CEO John Paton. I can’t decide whether I’m jealous of or pity the man, Steve Buttry, who has been tasked with unbolting four test newsrooms as DFM’s digital transformation editor.

He obviously knew what he was getting into. More than just refocusing attention to mobile reporting, engaging with audiences over social media or creating new ways to play with and use data, Project Unbolt is about actually changing how newsrooms think and act. Buttry elaborated on his blog this week about what it will actually entail and look like to ‘wrench’ newsrooms away from thinking for print. Here are some highlights:

  • Everything is live, all the time. He writes:

Virtually all event coverage and breaking news coverage are handled as live coverage, with ScribbleLive, livetweeting, livestreaming, etc. This includes sports events, government meetings, trials, community festivals, etc….Live coverage is routine for the unbolted newsroom. Reporters and/or visual journalists covering events plan for live coverage unless they have a good reason not to (a judge won’t allow phones or computers in a courtroom; a family would rather not have you livetweet a funeral; connectivity at a site is poor).

  • In the unbolted newsroom, you post content when you have an audience. Digital content is fresh every morning, you aren’t planning for morning editions, and those ‘Sunday magazine’ style features go up during the week. Read more

The Hottest Social Network These Days? Not Facebook — But It’s Owned By Them

Facebook remains the undisputed king of social networks. If you’re sharing your stories or looking for sources, your time is well spent there.

But if you want to keep up and catch up with your audience, you can’t be only there, especially as the web moves to an ever more-visually driven medium. (And no, “But I’m on Twitter, too” isn’t enough these days.)

A study out this month finds that the clear winner in growth is another Facebook-acquired property is gaining on its photo-sharing corporate cousin: Instagram. According to research firm GlobalWebIndex, whose quarterly social summary (for Q4 2013) released this month pegs Instagram as the fastest growing — by a long shot — social network.

According to their survey, Instagram grew a whopping 23% in active usage in the fourth quarter of 2013. That same period saw a 3% decrease in Facebook’s usage, as well as in YouTube. To be fair, Facebook is still the most trafficked network, and with far more users already signed on it has less room to grow, but other budding social networks are gaining on it. Read more

NEXT PAGE >>