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Posts Tagged ‘John Maxham’

DDB Chicago Lands New CCO

johnmaxhamDDB Chicago has appointed a new chief creative officer in John Maxham, who rejoins the agency after spending the last four years as executive creative director/partner at Seattle-based Cole & Weber United. Maxham, who originally served as SVP/GCD on all things AT&T at DDB Chi for two years, will now oversee the creative product and 100 staffers, working with clients including McDonald’s, State Farm, Mars Inc., Capital One and Safeway in the process. Maxham’s arrival will fill a six-month void left when Ewan Paterson and DDB Chicago parted ways.

His new boss, DDB Chicago CEO Paul Gunning, says in a statement, “I looked very hard to find a partner that would share in my passion for DDB and the iconic American brands we work on. I wanted a true leader with a diverse creative skill set who could not only work across media channels, but also flex from B2C to B2B. This was not an easy task but John is uniquely qualified.”

During his ad career, Maxham (who *shameless plug* talked to us about Super Bowl a couple of years ago) served as a creative director at Team One and an ACD at Lowe.

 

 

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Op-Ed: ‘Svper Bowl Svnday’ – Our Invented Ancient Tradition

Our Super Bowl series continues as we top the week off with a piece from John Maxham, who has spent the past two years as partner, ECD at Seattle’s own Cole & Weber United.

As we get ready to watch the Super Bowl and, of course, dissect the ads that go along with it, I’d like to call attention to a subtle form of marketing that is (almost) as old as the big game itself. Because when we gather together on Sunday, beers in hands, remotes at the ready, we will be sitting down to watch Super Bowl XLVI, not Super Bowl 46.

The use of Roman numerals in Super Bowl titles has become a widely accepted, if not often discussed part of the season finale. It dates back to Super Bowl 5, excuse me, Super Bowl V, when the championship game was a relatively new concoction.

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