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Posts Tagged ‘Col Allan’

Morning Reading List 06.06.13.

Brandus gives life advice to grads — In his column for The Week, Paul Brandus offers his advice to high school graduates. When he was was 18, he says, he made a list of everything he wanted to do with his life. One might call it a bucket list. As he got older he added some things to the list and dropped others. “You might think some of these are cliches — but they’re also true, and will help you lead a truly fulfilling life,” he says. It’s a pretty extensive list, and has cliches, as Brandus warned. But much of the list seemed like advice that wasn’t dished by out old, successful people at every commencement speech or given by every aunt, uncle and grandparent at graduation parties. The first piece of advice: “Zig when others zag.” Brandus goes on to encourage traveling, and taking only carry-ons whenever possible. He also gives a lot of advice about baseball — where to sit to catch a foul ball, which parks are the best, whether to watch games on TV or listen to them on the radio. Thanks for the advice, Paul. We’ll be sure not to visit the salad bar after 3 p.m.

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Plane-Gate: An Update

Earlier on FishbowlDC: “Reporters Booted From Obama Plane?” and “The Obama Plane: The Victims

Friday brought some controversy on the Obama plane: That the Washington Times, Dallas Morning News and New York Post were all denied seats on the Obama plane (all three endorsed John McCain).

Some updates: New York Post Editor-in-Chief Col Allan said, “We are happy to be on the outside looking in. It’s what makes The New York Post special. We are not in the news business to be liked.”

The Dallas Morning News’ Ryan J. Rusak said, “But we don’t have evidence that the newspaper’s endorsement of Sen. McCain had any bearing on the campaign’s decision to boot us from the plane.

A tipster says there were two empty seats on the plane yesterday. And it looks like the Washington Post gets two seats (Dan Balz was on there the other day). The Politico asked for two seats but was only given one. And a pool report from Friday night suggested that there was a second plane for Michelle Obama, although that seems to be gone now (the Obama campaign earlier said that adding a plane would be problematic).

Morning Reading List, 04.15.08

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Happy Tax Day Washington. Playbook tells us that “Patrick Henry, Ed’s son, is 7.” Here’s your TV coverage of the Pope’s visit. Here’s the full text of Sen. John McCain’s remarks to the AP annual meeting yesterday. Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks today. And be sure to check out TVNewser’s ongoing coverage of the 2008 NAB-RTNDA conference in Las Vegas.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • You think Obama’s bitter comment was totally overblown.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I just had a great job interview at a paper that has an actual functioning newsroom, with good editors who get to the root of the community’s problems. So, why am I angry? They can’t afford to pay me as much as the crappy paper I’m working at now. Damn IT!”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported on Saturday, “Caroline H. Little stepped down yesterday as chief executive and publisher of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the company announced.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe reports, “The Internet is up, the newspaper business is down, so no one would expect the top people at the Washington Post Company to be pulling down tens of millions of dollars a year like their counterparts in finance and entertainment. But they’re not suffering. According to 2007 filings, here are paychecks for the three best-paid Posties and their boss.”

  • Bernstein: what makes good journalism

  • British Journalist for CBS Freed in Iraqi Army Raid

  • My Wall Street Journal Editor: WSJ Officials ‘Pretty Thin-Skinned‘”

  • After 18 years as founding editor of ForbesLife, Christopher Buckley has decided to move into the role of editor at large in order to focus more on his writing.”

  • US military to free AP photographer

  • Writers Vs. Editors: A Battle for the Ages

  • The AP reports, “As newspaper publishers build up their online operations and struggle through an advertising slump, one group is worried about being left behind — the folks who make printing presses and other equipment used to make newspapers.”

  • Time for New Blood in Newspaper Boardrooms: A Slate

  • E&P reports, “U.S. daily newspapers shrank their newsrooms by 2,400 journalists in the past year, a 4.4% workforce decrease that’s the biggest year-over-year cut in ranks since the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) began conducting its annual census 30 years ago.”

  • A Second Opinion of David Brooks

  • Romenesko has a memo from the Post’s Frank Ahrens: “After our big Pulitzer win on Monday, there was some melancholy around the newsroom along the lines of, ‘Oh, this will be the last year this kind of thing will happen.’ I said just the opposite. I bet the Big Three — us, the Times and the Journal — will most likely increase our dominance of the Pulitzers in coming years. Why? Because it’s the mid-sized papers that have been/will be so hard-hit by cuts they will no longer be able to produce Pulitzer-caliber journalism.” And, Los Angeles Times’ Peter Spiegel responds: “Frank Ahrens is an old friend of mine, so I hate to disagree with him in public, but I feel the need to defend my employer’s honor. I’m not sure where he gets the idea that the Washington Post, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are ‘the big three’ of American newspaper journalism.”

  • The Editors Weblog reports, “San Jose Mercury News designer Martin Gee has posted a photo documentary of the effects of several rounds of layoffs and buyouts in his California newsroom.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Steinberg reports, “TK Continues to Win Argument Against Nobody”

  • Daily Campello Art News reports, “Norfolk newspaper The Virginian-Pilot sponsors an annual Student Gallery competition hosted at the Chrysler Museum of Art. The top awards were announced a couple of weeks ago at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where works by the contest’s 62 finalists are on display. Erin Ayres ‘Unveiled Tokens of Lonely and Deserted Past,’ was among two works that earned her the $1,000 first-place award. Now the controversy part… Teresa Annas, art critic for the same newspaper courageously writes that: This year’s top winners resulted from a third round of judging. The first two jurors selected nude artworks for first place. Those judges were Aaron De Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, and Scott Howe, director of education and public programs at the Chrysler Museum. The Virginian-Pilot, the contest’s main sponsor, declined to honor those choices.”

  • Business Week reports, “Who Rupert Murdoch Had On Speed Dial. … Among a list understandably studded with News Corp executives and operating heads, it’s interesting to find New York Post editor (and longtime Murdoch confidant) Col Allan.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Jack F. Patterson, a hard-nosed newspaper executive who guided The Washington Post to unprecedented circulation growth from the 1950s to the 1980s and who mentored generations of the paper’s top administrators, died April 9 of melanoma at his home in Bethesda. He was 93.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt explores “The Blur Between Analysis and Opinion”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell asks, “The Washington Post was awash in Pulitzer Prizes last week — six of them, the most ever for The Post. In the world of newspaper journalism, Pulitzers are the pinnacle. But the prizes are awarded by journalists to journalists. Do they mean anything to readers, especially in this perilous time of newspaper contraction?”

  • Ben Pershing’s Player of the Week is Sen. Robert Byrd. “And, at 90 years old and in increasingly poor health, he is the chairman of one of the most important committees in Congress. The headline news on Capitol Hill this week was about Iraq, housing and the Colombia free trade agreement. But below the surface, a crucial subplot was unfolding in the Senate, as Byrd’s Democratic colleagues cautiously began discussing whether he should continue to chair the Appropriations Committee. On Tuesday, about 15 key Senate Democrats discussed at a private meeting whether Byrd would be able to handle the upcoming Iraq supplemental bill, according to a Roll Call story (subscription required). That initial media report sparked a flurry of subsequent and sometimes contradictory stories in the Capitol Hill press. The Politico got several Senate Democrats saying — publicly, at least — that they support Byrd. Roll Call came back with a report that Byrd was calling colleagues in hopes of saving his job. The Hill newspaper said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) was angling for Byrd’s post, though Leahy denied it. … What’s really going on here? Why is there so much confusion on the subject? There are two primary reasons: Senate collegiality and media skittishness.”

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    TV

  • Obama doesn’t commit to N.C. debate

  • Debating the Debate Usage Guidelines

  • A release announced, “WTTG FOX 5 has been awarded four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards by the Radio-Television News Directors Association, including ‘Overall Excellence,’ announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. FOX 5 News also received awards in the ‘Best Newscast,’ ‘Investigative Reporting’ and ‘Videography’ categories.”

  • Ailes to B&C Hall of Fame

  • Newsweek asks, “Can news anchors like Katie Couric survive?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Indecency cases stuck in legal limbo at FCC”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “The 2008 Media Research Center’s DisHonors Awards took place last night in Washington, D.C. and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was (dis)honored with the ‘Quote Of The Year Award.’”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “CNN’s Wolf Blitzer isn’t just a newsman. He’s also a Washington sports nut, a regular at George Washington University men’s basketball games, a midcourt season ticket holder for the Washington Wizards, and big fan of the new Nationals baseball team. Lately, he’s tied both passions together, giving a Wizards pregame analysis from CNN’s Situation Room for the Verizon Center’s JumboTron. Now, he has his eyes on the Nats, whose new stadium boasts the biggest outfield TV ever. ‘I’d do it for the Nationals, too, but only if they want me,’ he tells us. ‘That’s a really big scoreboard.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter

  • CJR’s Curtis Brainard reports, “A strange thing happened Tuesday. The New Republic had just launched a new ‘Environment & Energy’ blog on Sunday, and it had already hit a bump in the road. Just below the blog’s masthead was a small, green logo with the words, ‘Powered by BP.’ Within a day of the launch, TNR readers had begun to complain about irony of an oil giant (even one that has been trying to burnish its green credential for years) ‘powering’ (most assumed sponsoring) a blog about issues such as climate change and the development of renewable fuels. Just as I was reading the blog’s inaugural posts and its readers’ comments I refreshed the page and, lo and behold, the controversial BP logo had disappeared.”

  • The AP reports, “As people turn increasingly to the Internet for their news, there is concern whether they are learning enough about what goes on in their communities. With ‘the thinning down of newspapers and local television in America, there is measurably less local, civic information available,’ said Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. ‘So what are the consequences of that?’ The foundation and the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, hope to find out.”

  • AdAge.com allows you to “Test Your Knowledge of Budget-Conscious News Ops and More in Media Guy’s Media-Studies Quiz”

  • PaidContent.org reports, “Salon Media, the parent of Salon.com, has raised $1 million in equity financing by selling its stock, just in time as its money was running out, again. The note, which it issued on April 4, 2008, may be convertible at a future date into common stock of the company at a conversion price equal of $1.68, it said in an SEC filing. They bear interest at the rate of 7.5 percent per annum, payable semi-annually, in cash or in kind, and mature on March 31, 2012, the filing states. It will use the funds raised for working capital and other general corporate purposes, the company said.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • BIG MAGAZINE TITLES SEE AD PAGES DWINDLE DOWN IN Q1

  • toohotfortnr writes, “On Monday, THFTNR goes out of business and Attackerman rises to take its place. That means I have a limited amount of time to take this blog back to its essence: the beef with TNR. And I have one score in particular that I badly need to settle. The story of Snitching Ryan Lizza.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington City Paper reports, “The health problems that sidelined WTOP’s Mark Plotkin for more than three months have apparently been resolved–the man was back in the chair this morning on the Politics Program in fine old form”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Gridskipper takes a look at The Newseum.

  • Don’t forget, the NLGJA-DC Happy Hour is Thursday, April 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel Helix Lounge at 1430 Rhode Island Ave., N.W.

  • Washington Social Diary reports, “There are small parties and there are big parties, and there are parties that are huge. Washington’s newest monumental addition, the Newseum, gave itself an opening party the other night that was huge — so many (one count had it at 1800) that they had to stand in line. Men in black tie, women in evening dresses, getting checked off the guest list.”

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    JOBS

  • St. Mary’s Today is looking for a News Desk/Reporter Person.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think the Yankees will make it to the playoffs.

  • Starting on Friday, C-SPAN Radio 90.1 FM in the Washington/Baltimore area is now broadcasting three channels in HD. If you have an HD radio, you’ll be able to hear these three C-SPAN Radio stations for free at 90.1. For more info, click here.

  • A release announced, “In an effort to ensure transparency and accountability in the continuing debate over the future of media ownership in America, Representatives Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Bart Stupak (D-MI), Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) … wrote to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin to request his immediate attention to a number of controversies surrounding the FCC’s activities on ten scientific studies released by the agency in late July.”

  • Shelly Palmer, “award-winning inventor, technologist, composer and television producer” will be the featured speaker at a seminar hosted by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. “Mr. Palmer’s presentation takes place 7- 9pm, Wednesday, September 26th at the Intelsat Building, 3007 Tilden Street, NW, Washington. Admission is free to students and NATAS members, $15 for non-NATAS members, payable at the door.”

  • Cable Takes A Ratings Hit

  • TheGarance has a guide to Iowa every political reporter should check out.

  • New York Magazine reports, “Denizens of the Wall Street Journal’s genteel newsroom were in need of smelling salts last Wednesday after reports surfaced that the paper’s new owner, Rupert Murdoch, brought Col Allan, the editor-in-chief of the New York Post, to a kick-the-tires meeting with their bosses.”

  • Al Neuharth, USA TODAY founder and former chair and chief executive officer of Gannett Co., Inc., addressed more than 1,200 guests and staff at a reception at USA TODAY’s headquarters in McLean, Va., on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the nation’s newspaper. Founded in 1982, USA TODAY’s launch was the most expensive and closely watched newspaper debut in history; 25 years later it is the nation’s top selling newspaper.” Check out his remarks here.

  • FishbowlNY reports, “The Kurt Eichenwald underage porn/cash payment story just got a hell of a lot more creepy.”

  • “PoliticsOnline and the World E-Gov Forum are proud to announce the list for nominations of the Top 10 Who Are Changing the World of Internet and Politics.” Check it out here.

  • Portfolio’s Jack Flack has “10 things that Rupert Murdoch may need to do with Dow Jones”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced, “Three leading journalists with long experience in business journalism will join the international faculty of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program at Beijing’s Tsinghua University. They include Robert J. Dowling, former managing editor of BusinessWeek International; Ann M. Morrison, former editor of Time Europe; and Nailene Chou Wiest, who was a Knight International Journalism Fellow in China and had worked for Reuters there. Wiest also will serve as the program’s co-director.”

  • The Etelos Ecosystem has partnered with the Web application company Entrecore.

  • Reuters reports, “Fears that a possible U.S. recession will sap advertising spending have soured investors on the media industry, but some entertainment companies just might be more resilient than Wall Street thinks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The New York Post is about to find out whether a glossy magazine can lift the fortunes of a gritty tabloid. Hoping to increase Sunday circulation and high-end advertising, the Post is introducing Page Six Magazine starting this Sunday.”

  • Fox Business Network has a new logo.

  • Connecticut Post’s Paul Janensch writes, “Q: Professor News, why did many journalists call USA Today ‘McPaper?’ A: Because, they said, it was the news equivalent of fast food — easy to swallow but not very nourishing. The criticism may have been warranted in its early years. But ‘The Nation’s Newspaper,’ which turned 25 last week, has proven to be enormously successful and widely imitated.”

  • At 25, ‘McPaper’ Is All Grown Up

  • Reuters reports, “Six months after grabbing Oscar glory for his eco-documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ former Vice President Al Gore collected an Emmy Award on Sunday for his fledgling youth-oriented cable network, Current TV.”

  • Economist leaves news fluff to others

  • The Associated Press reports, “Shares of New York Times Co. hit a 52-week low for the second day in a row Thursday as a Goldman Sachs analyst cut his price target and lowered some earnings estimates, citing disappointing August ad revenue results.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “NYT Has Seen Future: It’s All the Blogging That’s Fit to Print”

  • WAMU 88.5 announced, “Senior Commentator and Washington, D.C., radio veteran Fred Fiske will celebrate 60 years on the airwaves in Washington, D.C., on September 27.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Reed Elsevier Plc and Wolters Kluwer NV, two publishers that abandoned a merger in 1998, should again consider combining because of the ‘compelling’ strategic and financial logic of such a step, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Dow Jones & Company and its main labor union have moved close to agreement on a contract for reporters and other employees at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires, union officials said yesterday.”

  • From the Houston Chronicle, “Hardly a day passes without a reader (or two) accusing the paper of having an unabashed affinity for the opinions of ‘liberal’ columnists — eschewing those of conservatives. It’s a spurious assertion to which I reply: ‘What paper are you reading?’”

  • Chicago Tribune’s Michael Tackett writes, “The president lost another member of his senior staff Friday when Tony Snow ended his stint as White House press secretary. Snow is the third man to hold that job for President Bush, and by almost any measure, the best. His loss may be felt even more directly than that of the talented Mr. Rove.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “A newsroom without news editors might be the dream of many a trod-upon reporter. But if that really were the case, and it was online users instead who set the news agenda, a new report from The Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests the stories they’d choose to lead the day, and the sources of news to which they’d pay attention, would put us in a very different world of news.”

  • Check out Andrew Sullivan’s first reader contest and vote for the best movie line ever.

  • Daryn Kagan’s documentary film, “Breaking the Curse”, aired last night on WETA and will re-air tonight at 5PM.

  • Laura Rozen reports, “The network says it acted quickly when it discovered consultant Alexis Debat had misrepresented his credentials. But sources say a real investigation of his work is beginning only now.”

  • Gawker reports, “Times deputy managing editor Jonathan Landman, in one of his weekly memos to the staff about ‘Innovation,’ lays this deepness on you (emphasis ours): ‘Times have changed. Our online storytelling skills have evolved to the point where you really can get the whole story without reading a newspaper article.’”

  • The cover of Alan Greenspan’s new book, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World, features a cover portrait shot by U.S. News & World Report’s Jeff MacMillan several years ago for the magazine.

  • The Washington Post’s Frank Aherns writes, “The head of a burgeoning Afghan media empire looked down at his new BlackBerry, vibrating against a table in Washington earlier this week. ‘Afghan civilians injured in Gereshk suicide bombing,’ read the e-mail headline. Another day, another suicide bombing in another town. Another too-typical news event for Saad Mohseni’s stations to broadcast across a country where prime-time programming is scheduled to fit the nighttime hours when electrical generators are switched on.”

  • “News media organizations must become portfolio entrepreneurs that make experimentation and ‘iteration’ a way of life and that ‘put risk and speed at the center of the corporate altar,’ a new report from the Media Management Center concludes.”

  • A tipster tells us, “hotline is having a party, just later this fall. or so i hear.”

  • Variety reports, “News Corp. topper Peter Chernin has urged British TV chiefs to adopt innovative, risk-taking strategies and embrace new media — or risk extinction.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc is testing an experimental social network service called Mash that makes it easy for Yahoo users to share tidbits of their lives with friends and family online, the company said on Sunday. Mash, to which a limited number of public users began being invited as testers on Friday, was described by a spokeswoman as a new, next-generation service that is independent from the company’s 2-1/2 year-old Yahoo 360 degree profile service.”

  • NY Post reports, “By the time many of this fall’s new TV shows premiere later this month, a number of Web-savvy viewers will have already given their thumbs-up or thumbs-down. That’s because networks including NBC and Fox are offering free sneak peeks of the pilot episodes of their new shows online.”

  • Slate reports, “Why the WSJ Exodus Is Good for Murdoch”

  • New York Times reports, “Next year, The Wall Street Journal will introduce Pursuits, a glossy monthly magazine about the lifestyles of the rich, in hopes of drawing more ads for expensive consumer goods”

  • A reader writes in, “From a fan: Is Jose Antonio Vargas bumping fogies like Woodward off the front page? Vargas has had 9 front page stories on his online political beat. Where’s the NYT and WSJ?”

  • Forbes reports, “How’s USA Today celebrating it’s 25th anniversary this weekend? With shares of parent company Gannett at their lowest closing level in 10 years.”

  • AP reports USA Today “starts its second quarter century with plans to expand its brand beyond the world of journalism.”

  • E&P reports, “In another Web first, The New York Times has posted on its Web site a video Letter to the Editor from Charles Ferguson, the anti-war filmmaker, responding critically to L. Paul Bremer’s recent Op-Ed defending his order to dismantle the Iraqi Army in 2003 after the U.S. took Baghdad.”

  • Reuters reports, “Your cell phone may be one of the last spots around that’s relatively free of advertising — but not for long. Media and advertising companies have found a way of latching on to people’s handsets by beaming ads to them via Bluetooth, the same technology used in some hands-free headsets.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Screen Actors Guild announced Friday that it signed a contract to cover performers on “quarterlife,” a Web series that will debut Nov. 11 on MySpaceTV.com”

  • Need to Know News, LLC is looking for a Financial Markets Reporter.

  • The Guardian is looking for an Online Journalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Medical Writer.

  • The American Institute of Physics is looking for a News Reporter/Writer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a higher ed reporter.

  • ThinkTalk is seeking a Smart Dynamic Host.

  • UCG is looking for a Medical Coding Reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Editor.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Photo Graphics Technician.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • The Washington Center for Politics & Journalism is offering a Politics & Journalism Semester Internship.

  • Campaign for America’s Future is looking for a Senior Communications Associate.

  • Spitfire Strategies is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • US Newsventures is looking for an Editor.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • Girls’ Life is looking for an Online Editorial Director and Online Editorial Assistant.

  • TeamPeople is looking for a General Manager: Media Support, AV.

  • Legal Times is looking for an Advertising Director.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for a production designer/web assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Deborah Orin-Eilbeck: Remembered

    orinpostpic.jpg

    (Earlier)

    The Associated Press:

      Orin-Eilbeck, a native New Yorker, graduated with honors from Harvard University. She received a master’s degree from Northwestern University, Rubenstein said. Orin-Eilbeck, who was fluent in French, also studied at the Sorbonne in Paris, he said.

      She was a gourmet cook and an avid gardener and was passionate about politics. …

      “She was never part of press group think that so often rules Washington,” Allan said in a statement issued through Rubenstein. “Common sense ruled her mind not dogma. I will miss her advice, and the Post readers will miss her honesty and wisdom.”

      Orin-Eilbeck is survived by her husband, Neville Eilbeck, her father, Aaron Slotkin, and her brother, Mark Slotkin.

      No information about burial arrangements was immediately available.

    From the New York Post:

      Post Editor-in-Chief Col Allan said, “Deborah was one of the nation’s finest political reporters. She was never part of press group-think that so often rules Washington.

      “Common sense ruled her mind, not dogma. I will miss her advice, and The Post’s readers will miss her honesty and wisdom.”

      Orin-Eilbeck, 59, joined the New York Post in 1977 after a stint with the Long Island Press, and she immediately made her mark on New York politics.

      When the Post dispatched her to Washington in 1988, she quickly emerged as one of the nation’s top political journalists.

    The New York Sun:

      Stuart Marques, metropolitan editor at the Post in the 1980s and for many years Orin-Eilbeck’s editor, said, “She was all about getting it first and getting it right, and she was totally dedicated to it.”

    John Podhoretz:

      My colleague Deborah Orin-Eilbeck died yesterday, at the horribly young age of 59. Debbie combined a hard-hitting professional style and a wonderfully straightforward personal style in a way that made her alternately hated by many of the people she covered, respected by many of the people who worked next to her in the White House press room, and beloved by her colleagues at the New York Post. We weren’t friends, we were only colleagues, and not very close colleagues at that. But Debbie was the sort of person who would offer you aid and comfort at a moment’s notice and also the sort of journalist who always asked the right question at the right moment. Her profession is the lesser for her parting. More important, though, she is someone who will be remembered with fondness for the remainder of their lives by literally hundreds upon hundreds of people she worked with, for, and beside. And that’s a pretty great monument.

    (Photo Credit)