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Posts Tagged ‘Knight Kiplinger’

FishbowlDC Interview With Knight Kiplinger

Say hello to Knight Kiplinger, Editor in Chief, Kiplinger publishing (Kiplinger Letters, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, Kiplinger.com). We spoke by phone this morning just after he did his ritualistic yoga exercises. He spends 20 minutes each morning doing stretches and poses to put himself in a good frame of mind. “I don’t watch much TV,” he noted quickly into the call, saying the Fishbowl interview wasn’t necessarily ideal for someone who doesn’t watch a lot of TV. (We’ll keep that in mind.) “I’m not older than dirt, but I came up through newspaper journalism and print journalism so that’s kind of my bias in my news diet.” Asked about the current state of journalism, Kiplinger’s thoughts are enlightening. POLITICO reporters, you may want to stop reading now. “I think we’ve seen the decline of careful consideration, the emphasis is on quick response, the immediate reaction,” Kiplinger said. “The best journalism is not always the fast journalism. The first analysis is often not carefully considered. Good journalism takes time. It takes reporting. We’ve seen a decline of in-depth reporting. A newspaper reporter had eight or ten hours to do hard reporting, deep reporting, talking to many, many sources before writing a story. The internet has forced everyone to work faster and that sometimes undercuts journalistic quality. So that is the problem.” Here’s the point where WaPo‘s Ezra Klein should stop reading. “These days a lot of young journalists, they all want to be columnists, giving the world their opinions,” he said. “Journalists try to build themselves into a brand, into a marketable entity that can move from periodical to periodical. Of course, that’s what columnists have always done.” Kiplinger sees danger signs. “With too much emphasis on celebrity, the content of journalism gets short shrift. A bigger threat to quality journalism is the unwillingness of young adults to pay for journalism. Older adults will still pay for content. They comprise the subscription-paying readership.” Kiplinger still gets two newspapers at home: WaPo and TWT. At the office he reads WSJ and NYT. “I look through them very rapidly,” he says of WaPo and TWT, saying he prefers to read them in print than online and can do so faster. He particularly enjoys WaPo‘s Metro section. He’s also a relentless reader of obituaries. “In my next life I am going to be an obit writer,” he says. Moving along, he has grave concerns about the industry: “Revenue on internet is not sustaining high quality journalism,” he said. But on a positive note, he added, “the internet has given everyone [a medium]…that is a powerful force, a positive force. This trend will continue.” On the future of journalism: “There will be fewer jobs in traditional journalism for young journalists who want to be the reporter, who want to tell the story of modern life. I don’t want to sound like a curmudgeon. We’re in the throws of a great democratization of media. Editing today is a luxury many media feel they can’t afford. You don’t have the level of trust that you once had. Traditional media were gatekeepers to information. They were the mandarins who selected what they thought the public needed to know.” Kiplinger is on Twitter, but he’s not enthralled by it. “Yeah I tweet,” he said. “If you went to my Twitter account you’d see I tweet infrequently. I try to restrain my tweets to kind of broader observations about things going on in the economy. I work very hard to condense and distill. I don’t have a Twitter support staff as a lot of semi-celebrity journalists do.” As an aside, he notes…“There are some people who think I am a celebrity. I just think I’m an ink-stained wretch. I’m not a hyperactive tweeter.” On family…He’s a longtime choral singer and met his wife in the Washington Chorus in 1979. Incidentally, his daughter also met her fiance in the Washington Chorus (a detail reported in WaPo earlier this week). Facebook? “I don’t do Facebook at all. I don’t think the world is that interested in my daily life, and even if they are, I don’t want to share it with them.” Finally, I asked…what one piece of wisdom should every journalist know? He replied, “There’s no substitute for hard reporting.”

If you were a carbonated beverage, which would you be?  

Schweppes Tonic Water (with real quinine), my teenage favorite, even before I started adding gin.

How often do you Google yourself?

Rarely (Just noticed they now have photos of the search subject, too!)

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor/boss (or vice versa)?  

To the owner of the first newspaper I worked for, at 22 years old: “Reporters ought to earn as much as the layout guys with their razor blades and paste pots.”  (He disagreed.)

You have an intriguing name. What is the story behind it?

It was my maternal grandmother’s maiden name (full name: Daphne Knight). No relation to the Knight publishing family, darn it.

Who is your favorite working journalist and why?

David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.  No one explains complex economic issues with more clarity and common sense than Wessel.

Do you have a favorite word?

I’m told I overuse “unconscionable,” so maybe that’s it.

Who would you rather have dinner with – CNN’s Candy Crowley, ABC’s Martha Raddatz or Fox News’ Megyn Kelly? Tell us why.

I’m sure each of them would be a fine dinner companion, but I’d rather dine with Renee Montagne of NPR, co-host of “Morning Edition.”  She’s a brainy journalist (Phi Beta from Berkeley), award-winning correspondent in South Africa and Afghanistan, adept anchor—and she sounds like a very nice person (based on interviews I hear regularly, and ones I’ve done with her while I was in the DC studio and she was at NPR West in California).

The Earth’s human population is dying out and you must save it. You will spend a romantic evening with either Scandal’s Kerry Washington, any of the women from FNC’s “The Five” or MSNBC’s S.E. Cupp. Who will it be? (None is not an option.)

I don’t know any of these women on sight (don’t watch much TV), so you pick one for my blind date, and I’m sure she and I will be able to save the Earth together. [Okay, we'll play your game. We pick Helen Thomas. That's what you get for not answering.]

What swear word do you use most often? “Damn!”…used sparingly.

You’ve just been told the big news: You get to have your own Sunday morning talk show. Who will be on your roundtable? (Pick four journalists or pundits types.)

Cokie Roberts, David Frum, Kathleen Parker, David Brooks. (Back-ups for when someone is traveling or out sick: Peggy Noonan and E. J. Dionne.)

On a serious note for a moment, if you could have dinner with a person who has died, who would it be?

My zany and wise mother, Gogo Kiplinger (1919-2007)

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Kiplinger’s Kickin’ It on “Your Money Bus” Tour

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DC-based Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine has joined the NAPFA Consumer Education Foundation (NCEF), TD AMERITRADE and FiLife.com to launch the second year of the Your Money Bus Tour.

Kicking off October 1 in Boston, the Your Money Bus is traveling coast-to-coast for one year-visiting more than 25 cities nationwide to offer free financial advice from professional financial advisors.

“At Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, we have been helping our readers save and invest to reach their financial goals for more than 60 years,” says editor in chief Knight Kiplinger.

I say, “Hey Knight, can your bus swing by Georgetown for about a week? I have some financial goals that need a little TLC.”

If not, I will have to catch the bus during it’s DC stop on November 11, 2009. More details on events taking place in each city are available at www.YourMoneyBus.com.

Morning Reading List, 03.11.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you did not watch the last episode of The Wire.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Ben Goessling joined The Washington Times sports staff last weekend, joining Mark Zuckerman in Viera, Fla., where they will finish covering spring training. He’ll be covering the Nationals with Mark this season. Ben was previously at the Star Tribune in Minneapolis.

  • Kellie Lunney has been hired as Government Executive’s new senior editor. She is replacing Anne Laurent.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Politico’s Bill Nichols turned 50 yesterday.

  • The Independent reports, “The Financial Times is set to break the mould again when it relaunches its FT Weekend edition for Sunday readers with a big marketing campaign later this spring. Already one of the highest-circulation Saturday newspapers in the UK, the FT is working on secret plans to make the edition work just as well on the next day.”

  • USA Today reports, “A federal judge has ordered a former USA TODAY reporter to begin paying fines of up to $5,000 per day after finding her in contempt of court for failing to identify sources who named former Army scientist Steven Hatfill as a possible suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “‘We are uncomfortable with the term ‘citizen journalism,” said Todd Wolfson, 35, a doctoral candidate at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the organizers of the Media Mobilizing Project in Philadelphia. ‘We prefer the term ‘community journalism.” Citizen journalism has become the faddish name for the effort to encourage regular folk to use the Internet to report the news directly, but Mr. Wolfson had a point: many of the people whom his organization and an immigrant rights group, Juntos, are teaching to make video reports for streaming on the Internet are not citizens. Many are not even legal residents.”

  • Forbes.com reports,Lachlan Murdoch is facing a setback in his plans for re-entry into the media sector. After the major financial backer of his proposed $3.3 billion takeover of Consolidated Media Holdings suddenly walked away from the deal, the elder son of Rupert Murdoch is now knocking on the doors of other U.S. investors, seeking support for the bid.”

  • New York Times’ Public Editor writes, “In the 10 days leading up to Hillary Clinton’s victories last week in Ohio and Texas, the news media came under withering attack for being, in the words of a ‘Saturday Night Live’ skit, ‘totally in the tank’ for Barack Obama. After Clinton won, Obama said the news media caved under pressure from her campaign and suggested that her record has not been as thoroughly examined as she claims. What about The Times? Has it been in the tank for Obama and unfairly tough on Clinton? Has it looked enough into their records and backgrounds? Many readers have complained that the newspaper is not shooting down the middle.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Thousands of women — including this one — were offended by an Outlook opinion piece last Sunday by writer Charlotte Allen. Complaints flooded my in-box, letters to the editor, the comment board linked to the article on washingtonpost.com, and the blogs. Outlook editors thought the piece was humorous and knew it might be controversial, but they were stunned at the outpouring of outrage.” Check out the reader comments here.

  • The Inhofe EPW Press Blog reports, “USA Today and the Los Angeles Times provided hope today that the media may be turning away from hyping alarmism and platitudes on environmental issues and instead offering the public fair and balanced information. The first hopeful report is from USA Today on the science and politics of listing polar bears under the Endangered Species Act, and the second is an editorial from the Los Angeles Times stripping bare the rhetoric and reality about cap-and-trade legislation.”

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    TV

  • When it rains it pours: Another glowing profile of “Morning Joe.”

  • A MSNBC release announced, “MSNBC, the Place for Politics, is expanding its already substantial political programming lineup next week as the 2008 presidential race continues to heat up. NBC News Chief White House Correspondent David Gregory will anchor ‘Race for the White House,’ a fast-paced daily look at the latest election news, weekdays, 6-7 p.m. ET on MSNBC. ‘Race for the White House’ premieres Monday, March 17, and will continue through the election and beyond as the nation’s focus continues on the historic Presidential campaign. Also bolstering MSNBC’s political coverage, NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell will anchor MSNBC each weekday afternoon, 1-2 p.m. ET’”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “The ‘stupid computer’ is a repeated target of the dimwitted office manager Michael Scott on ‘The Office.’ But the show itself may be motivating viewers to put down their remote controls and pick up their laptops.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Imagine lying on the couch watching the latest episode of ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ when suddenly a catchy new song plays. You click on your TV remote, buy the song, and download the tune to your laptop — without missing a second of the melodrama on the screen. Starting this spring, Backchannelmedia Inc. will be one step closer to making that a reality. During an initial launch in May, the Boston company will test a new technology on WCVB-TV Channel 5 that allows viewers to use their remotes to tag — or bookmark — Internet sites and products that are featured on TV so they can check them out later on their computers. In future versions, Backchannelmedia expects viewers will be able to purchase the products and services they see during their favorite TV shows and commercial breaks.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Originally set to run through Super Tuesday II, then extended through the end of last week, TVNewser has learned America’s Election HQ will continue indefinitely during the 5pmET hour on FNC.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Knight Kiplinger posted on Kiplinger.com’s Politics blog for the first time yesterday about how Barack Obama is no JFK.

  • The Observer reports, “Richard Branson could scoop $750m if Virgin Media is sold to US private equity groups, which are actively considering launching a takeover bid, despite continuing turmoil in the credit markets. According to a private document entitled ‘Project Coaxial’ — seen by The Observer — Blackstone, Cinven, KKR and Providence Equity are prepared to offer $6bn to $7.5bn for the company, in which Branson’s Virgin group holds a 10.5 per cent share.”

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comcast Interactive Capital will invest in Giant Realm, the rapidly growing affiliate network of video game/entertainment sites targeting men 16-34. The venture-capital arm of the cable giant will lead a new round of financing totaling $3.5 million. Giant Realm also is backed by Edison Ventures Fund and WMA, which founded and previously funded the company. Giant Realm CEO James Green said the cash infusion will fuel expansion of its staff, enhancement of the Giant Realm destination site and enable further development of its online publisher group.”

  • The New York Times reports, “In an effort to slow Google’s siphoning of advertising dollars away from television, the nation’s six largest cable companies are making plans for a jointly owned company that would allow national advertisers to buy customized ads and interactive ads across the companies’ systems.”

  • Business Wire reports, “The Washington Post Company announced today that it will sponsor a global competition for digital startups from LaunchBox Digital, a Washington, DC-based investment firm focused on cutting edge mobile and Web technologies. Called ‘LaunchBox08,’ the competition encourages applicants to submit innovative ideas in order to receive seed funding and participate in a 12-week business building program with access to first-rate mentors and advisors.”

  • A reader tells us, “Express has audio of the president singing. It’s from a YouTube video. The vid itself is pretty bad, but the audio’s good.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader points out to us, “Time’s Ana Marie Cox calls Bush ‘War Criminal’”

  • The AHCJ Awards have been announced and among the winners are National Journal’s James A. Barnes and Marilyn Werber Serafini who received second place for “The Debate Over Health Care Reform”

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    JOBS

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Deputy Managing Editor, NationalJournal.com

  • American Bar Association, Rule of Law Initiative is looking for an Outreach Director.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for an Online Marketing Associate.

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