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Posts Tagged ‘Lloyd Grove’

Daily Beast Putting Death Knell on White House Press Corps

coffin_lg.gif The Daily Beast’s Lloyd Grove has put a dreary spin on the state of the White House Press Corps. Grove’s boss, Editor Tina Brown, doesn’t do much to help the attitude that the White House is determining its own press. Brown, in promoting Grove’s piece, in a tweet said: “Hey White House press corps, are you aware you are now irrelevant?”

Read “Death of the White House Press Corps” here.

Gregory’s Quest to be King

s-DANCE-DAVID-GREGORY-large.jpgThe Daily Beast’s Lloyd Grove interviews NBC “Meet the Press” Host David Gregory in his lengthy “Off the Air” feature. It’s a shock to receive the URL, which reads (in part): david-gregory-off-the-air.

Gregory (very much ON the air), began hosting the show in December 2008 after the beloved Tim Russert died.

Standout Quotes:

1. “We’re still on top after my first year.”

2. “I want to be agenda-setting.”

3. “It’s not who is a better hustler or booker.”

4. “I don’t think dancing on Meet the Press would be a good idea.”

5. “…those times when we got beaten on a Sunday, I hated it.”

Gregory tells Grove that ass-kissing “comes with the territory.” On people sucking up to him: “…in some cases people are nicer sometimes, they curry favor because they want to be on the program.”

Read Grove’s Gregory interview here.

Sunday Show Notes: CNN in HD, Norah for Chris, Ratings, and George

• CNN’s “State of the Union with John King” debuted a new open in HD yesterday.

• MSNBC’s Norah O’Donnell filled in for Chris Matthews on his Sunday show for the first time yesterday.

• Your Sunday show ratings for last week, courtesy of TVNewser. Sunday, Sept. 6th, NBC’s “Meet the Press” took first in total viewers and the demo, ABC and CBS mixed it up- “This Week” placed second in total viewers, while “Face the Nation” placed second in the demo. Check out the numbers here.

• And on the Daily Beast, the 7 Best Moments from Sunday Talk.

• Also on the Daily Beast, ABC’s George StephanopoulosCatches Up” with Lloyd Grove on his relationship with the Clintons and Rahm Emanuel, his appearance on “The O’Reilly Factor” and what he says sets him apart from his Sunday show competitors- “My experience in Congress, in the House, in presidential campaigns, in the White House, I hope it’s one of the things that sets me apart on Sunday morning and in my day-to-day work—that people know that I’ve been there, that I understand the issues, that I understand the politics, that I’ve lived it. Not just talked about it.”

And after the jump, check out video on CBSNews.com from Steve Kroft‘s interview with President Obama, which aired on “60 Minutes” last night…

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Morning Reading List, 10.24.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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We Read Lloyd Grove’s 4,251 Word Profile of Katharine Weymouth So You Don’t Have To…

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Above: Katharine Weymouth, continuing her “Who Says Publishers Can’t Be Sexy?” campaign

The highlights of Lloyd Grove‘s Portfolio piece after the jump…(and do not forget to click on this stunning graph, which really hammers home the tough spot the Washington Post is in…)

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Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo, CNBC’s Erin Burnett, Newsweek’s Jon Meacham, Wall Street Journal’s Peggy Noonan, Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson, NBC’s Political Director Chuck Todd

  • Face the Nation: Senators Lindsey Graham (R-NC) and Jack Reed (D-RI) and Ana Marie Cox, Time.com, Roger Simon, Politico.com and Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Time Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief.

  • This Week: Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Sen. Jon Kyl (R-AZ) and Sen. Chuck Hagel (R-NE) and a roundtable with Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Cynthia Tucker, Time Magazine’s Jay Carney, ABC News Claire Shipman and George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Governor Bill Richardson (D-NM), Governor Ed Rendell (D-PA), former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors Glenn Hubbard and a panel with Brit Hume, Jill Zuckman, Bill Kristol and Juan Williams. The Power Player of the Week is Eli Manning.

  • Late Edition: Sen. Arlen Specter (R-PA), Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), Mowaffak al-Rubaie, Iraq National Security Adviser, Gov. Janet Napolitano (D-AZ), Sen. Obama campaign supporter, Grover Norquist, president, Americans for Tax Reform, Laura Tyson, former economic adviser for Pres. Clinton, Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Sen. Clinton campaign supporter; Bill Schneider, CNN senior political analyst, Mark Halperin, senior political analyst, TIME magazine, Jessica Yellin, CNN congressional correspondent

  • Chris Matthews Show: Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune; Elisabeth Bumiller of the New York Times; Norah O’Donnell, MSNBC Chief Washington correspondent; and John Heilemann of New York magazine

  • Reliable Sources: Eric Deggans, media critic, St. Petersburg Times, Michael Medved, conservative talk radio host, Byron Pitts, national correspondent, CBS News, Andrea Peyser, columnist, New York Post, Lloyd Grove, contributor, New York Magazine, Ali Velshi, CNN senior business correspondent, Jim Cramer, host of “Mad Money”, CNBC, Steve Wilson, investigative reporter, WXYZ Detroit

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Assistant Treasury Secretary for Financial Markets, Anthony Ryan will be interviewed by Wall Street Journal Chief Economics Correspondent, Greg Ip, and Washington Post Economics Reporter, Neil Irwin.

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin

  • This is America: A roundtable with Eleanor Clift of Newsweek, David Boaz of the Cato Institute, Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune, Fox News political analyst columnist Linda Chavez, TV news political analyst columnist Bob Franken, and Deborah Simmons of the Washington Times.

  • CN8′s Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Bruce Josten from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

    Note: The guest lists for Tim Russert was unavailable.

  • Morning Reading List, 10.22.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • The White House bids farewell to Josh Deckard.

  • A NBC release announced, “‘Meet the Press,’ the longest running television show in the world, reached a programming milestone, airing its 3,000th broadcast last Sunday, October 14. In addition, according to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press’ topped the competition on Sunday, winning in all categories across the
    country and in Washington D.C.”

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column. Clark Hoyt’s too.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 14, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fifth straight week. This marks the sixth time in seven weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers. ‘This Week’ is also the only Sunday discussion program up year-to-date (4%) among Total Viewers.”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for Oct. 7-12 shows, “The debut of Fred Thompson as a GOP debater helped make last week the second-biggest week of the year in the talk show universe for the 2008 presidential campaign. But so did a talk brouhaha over a more tangential topic involving the debate.”

  • Herald Sun reports, “Speaking at News Corp’s annual meeting of stockholders in New York, Mr. Murdoch, said the global media giant’s proven track record spoke for itself. ‘Revenues have grown an average of 14 percent a year over the past five years and operating income is up 14 percent a year on average over the past four years,’ he said.”

  • Food Service Monthly has started a blog! Check it out.

  • PBC announced that “White House Chronicle” now airs on the Washington-Baltimore area’s three major PBS affiliates: WHUT-TV, Channel 32, WETA-TV, Channel 26, and WMPT-TV, Channel 22. Also, XM Satellite Radio will air “White House Chronicle” on P.O.T.U.S. ’08 (Channel 130) every Saturday, beginning Oct. 12.

  • New York Times reports, “Media companies are often criticized for not taking enough risks in choosing television shows, authors, movies and musicians. But when it comes to technology start-ups, their appetite for risk appears to be on the rise.”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Leading Internet and media companies teamed up … to set ground rules for dealing with copyright infringement in videos uploaded to user-generated content Web sites — and demanding stronger efforts on the part of content hosts.”

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. communications regulators cited conservative commentator Armstrong Williams on Thursday for violating a ban on ‘payola’ in promoting the Bush administration’s education plan.”

  • USA Today reports, “Google’s third-quarter revenue jumped 57%, but a hiring binge and product speculation left Wall Street wondering what the search giant wasn’t revealing.”

  • A reader tells us that NBC4 anchor Wendy Rieger. said her weekly Going Green reports on NBC4 (Tuesdays at 5:00pm) and has been picked up on by New York folks and “mandated that all NBC affiliates show her reports or take up the cause on their own. Even Brian Williams started his own Going Green segment on Nightly News, mainly from what Wendy started here. Way to go!”

  • Rieger is also hosting a gay-youth assistance fundraiser, SMYAL, on November 4. Click here for more details.

  • AP reports, “To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible. An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through Comcast cable modems. We picked the Bible for the test because it’s not protected by copyright and the file is a convenient size. In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked.” Also, the AP reports, “Comcast Corp. actively interferes with attempts by some of its high- speed Internet subscribers to share files online, a move that runs counter to the tradition of treating all types of Net traffic equally.”

  • From Wonkette: “Flipping though an advanced copy of Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, one item popped off the page. Apparently, Thompson used to date Sally Quinn of The Washington Post: ‘He was always pumping me,’ she says of the late journalist’s thirst for Washington gossip.”

  • Find out why his Extreme-ness calls Campaigns & Elections Magazine’s Walter Alarkon “The Best Political Reporter Today.”

  • Roll Call is holding an Adjournment Contest! “Guess, to the minute, the exact date and time that the second chamber of Congress will adjourn sine die for the first session of the 110th Congress. The person who comes closest to the actual time wins. If there is a tie, Roll Call will hold a drawing to determine the winner.” The winner gets a $500 gift certificate to Fogo de Chão. Email your entry to contest@rollcall.com by 5 p.m. Oct. 26.

  • CQ wants to know what you think about CQPolitics.

  • A reader writes in, “perhaps Facebook is more trouble than it’s worth — it’s just another vehicle for self-important journos who are more about capped teeth than reporting…”

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Colbert ‘run’ risks breaking law”

  • Lloyd Grove interviews Donnie Deutsch for Portfolio.com, “and gets the adman and CNBC host to address the Ann Coulter interview, his show as a vehicle to pick up women, future marriage and the Fox Business Network.”

  • A reader writes in: “It would be great if Stu Rothenberg started speaking in the third person. George is getting upset!”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comedy Central is getting more of Jon Stewart. The network said late Thursday that it has signed an extension with the ‘Daily Show’ host that will keep him around until at least 2010. Stewart’s contract would have expired at the end of 2008.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Tony Snow, the Fox News host-turned White House spokesman-turned unemployed guy, has signed on to be the keynote speaker at this year’s American Magazine Conference. Larry Hackett, managing editor of People, will conduct a Q&A with him. The conversation will be on the record — a good thing, since an attempt three years ago to keep Bill Clinton’s AMC remarks from leaving the room was contemptuously ignored by journalists in attendance. A spokeswoman for the Magazine Publishers of America declined to say if Snow — who left his job as White House spokesman saying he needed to make more money would be paid for the appearance.”

  • Bloomberg reports,Dean Singleton’s MediaNews Group Inc., the largest closely held U.S. newspaper publisher, plans to triple sales from its Internet sites by 2012.”

  • B&C reports, “The Federal Communications Commission issued its first fines for a station airing Armstrong Williams’ Department of Education-paid-for plugs for its ‘No Child Left Behind’ initiative. Station-owner Sinclair Broadcast Group doesn’t plan to pay the fine and said it will take the commission to court.”

  • To clarify, Major Garrett is currently the Chief Congressional Correspondent for FNC, but he was on the trail for the 2004 Presidential race and the 2006 mid-term elections.. he is not new to the campaign trail and has experience on the road covering the beat in previous elections.

  • Check out Mixed Media’s critique of Newsweek’s new design.

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger November Meetup is Wednesday, November 14, 2007 at 7:00 PM at RFD. Click here for full details.

  • Michael Getler, the PBS Ombudsman, writes, “Frontline, the outstanding (my opinion as well as that of many others) documentary series marked the beginning of its 25th season this week with another look into the often-closed world in which Vice-President Dick Cheney operates. The hour-long debut on Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, was titled ‘Cheney’s Law.’ It was produced by Michael Kirk, who could reasonably be labeled Minister of the Interior for his efforts, over the past six years, in turning out ten Frontline programs that, in one way or another, probed those activities of the Bush administration—whether one agrees with them or not—that have largely developed and been carried on out of public view.”

  • E&P reports, “Although Washington Post Radio was dropped last month after an unsuccessful 18-month run, the paper is still dealing with the fallout. A Newspaper Guild complaint that newsroom staffers had to perform extra work on the broadcast outlet has sparked a National Labor Relations Board hearing set for next week.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some good news about the media has actually been making headlines. When was the last time that happened? 1974? The bombshell is ProPublica, a brand-new investigative journalism outfit to be launched in January by one of the most respected figures in the newspaper business, longtime Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Paul Steiger.”

  • This week’s TV Q&A from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Rob Owen responds to questions about ads on WPXI, Jerry Seinfeld’s ‘Bee Movie’ minisodes on NBC and HBO’s ‘Five Days.’”

  • A release announced, “Inspired by Lions For Lambs (starring Robert Redford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise), MGM and YOUTUBE have extended the opportunity to submit videos to Youtube in order to win $25,000 for a charity of the winner’s choice. Participants have until October 24th to submit a 90 second video explaining thoughts on key issues and causes in today’s world.” For more info, click here.

    Jobs

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Editor/Writer.

  • The Cecil Whig is looking for a Web-savvy copy editor.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • Jamestown Foundation is looking for a Publications Coordinator.

  • The Frederick News Post is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDCH is looking for an In-House News Transcriber.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Satellite Coordinator.

  • Migration Policy Institute is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is looking for a Technical Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for an entry level writer.

  • Exchange Monitor Publications, Inc. is looking for Reporters.

  • The Current Newspapers is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Systems Engineer

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend Edition, Sunday and an Assistant Editor, Digital Media News.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.16.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Did you make it? The deadline for this year’s Knight News Challenge grants and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning competition, was yesterday!

  • Washington Life’s Curse: Jinxing diplomatic corps?

  • Don’t miss the Watergate Conference on Political & Congressional Reporting at the Watergate this weekend. For the full schedule, click here.

  • From NickDenton.com: “Each new medium — from the yellow press at the turn of the century, to the movies, television, trash television, video games and talk radio — has been the greatest threat to civilized discourse since, well, since the previous threat to civilized discourse. So, it’s something of a rite of passage that blogs in general — and Gawker in particular — are the subject of a critical cover story in this week’s New York magazine, one of the last bastions of old-school journalism. The cover line: ‘Gawker.com and the culture of bile.’”

  • His Extreme-ness points out two hair-raising (haha) similarities between The New York Times and Washington Post.

  • The Washington Post launched part two of “How the World Sees America” yesterday. Check it out here.

  • A CNN release announced, “The CNN Digital Network has staked a new high ground in September, topping not only all ‘Current Events and Global News’ sites but also beating out all other ‘News and Information’ sites including Internet stalwarts Wikipedia and the Weather Channel.”

  • Press Gazette reports, “Guardian News and Media is to make its entire archive, 212 years of material, available online as a paid-for service. The first phase of the online archive, comprising the Guardian from 1821 to 1975 and The Observer from 1900 to 1975, will launch on 3 November, the company said today.”

  • CNN reports, “A wide-open presidential race and a willingness by candidates, interest groups, unions and corporations to buy TV time will lead to historic spending for political and issue-advocacy advertising in the 2008 election cycle, an analysis shows.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “You may have heard of Second Life, the virtual online world that draws millions of aficionados every day. Now imagine a Second Life specifically for business, a world where workers can gather, share files, and communicate securely in a fully animated 3D office environment in cyberspace. Creating exactly that is what Justin Rounds does for a living. Rounds, 35, is a contractor for Sun Micro Systems in Burlington. He is one of the digital animators behind the MPK20 Project, Sun’s yet-to-be unveiled virtual workplace.”

  • E&P reports, “The death Sunday of journalist Salih Saif Aldin, the first Washington Post reporter killed in Iraq, will not spark a shift in the paper’s Iraq coverage or an increase in security measures, says Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr., who contends that the paper has always sought as much protection for reporters there as possible.”

  • Newsmax’s Ronald Kessler reports, “While at the Daily News and previously the Washington Post, [Lloyd] Grove would receive up to 10 invitations a day to attend the most glistering celebrity parties. Now the invitations are down to a trickle, but he claims he doesn’t mind.”

  • Wonkette raises the topic everyone is dying to talk about (don’t deny it).

  • Time’s James Poniewozik writes, “If the Fox News formula is going to work at FBN, in other words, then FBN will have to be even more like CNBC — more excited, effusive and rah-rah — than CNBC is. Is that possible? Judging at least by the first few hours, it’s going to try its damnedest.”

  • From AdAge: “Media Guy Quits His Complaining and Offers Up a Few Well-Deserved Shout-Outs (No, Seriously, He Does, Really)”

  • AP reports, “AOL is eliminating another 2,000 jobs worldwide as it tries to cut costs and make room to grow in online advertising.”

  • Denver Post’s Joanne Ostrow writes, “It’s a sign of the fragmented media times that Howard Kurtz’s ‘Reality Show: Inside the Last Great Television News War’ is mostly generating shrugs”

  • CJR has, “Salih’s Story”

  • The Independent reports, “CBS, one of America’s biggest radio and television networks, last week paid a reported $10m for little-known celebrity gossip blog DotSpotter.com.”

  • Power Line reports, “Today General Ricardo Sanchez gave a speech to the Military Reporters and Editors’ annual conference, in which he criticized just about everyone associated with our effort in Iraq. The Washington Post’s headline was typical: ‘Former Iraq Commander Faults Bush.’ Actually, I don’t believe Sanchez ever mentioned Bush by name, although, as I say, he was critical of just about everybody. But it would be hard to tell from press accounts of Sanchez’s speech that he was mostly critical of…the press.”

  • Reuters reports, “Random House, the world’s biggest book publisher, is considering joining a book-search project run by Google, once considered an arch-enemy by the paper publishing industry.”

  • Chicago Business reports, “AT&T Inc. is laying the groundwork for an assault on Comcast Corp.’s local cable TV monopoly starting this spring, perhaps as soon as April.”

  • Ed Driscoll explores, “The Legacy Media’s Brain Drain”

  • Don’t miss “Editrix of the Trade: How to Keep Your Job and Your Sanity as a Female Journalist in Washington, DC,” tomorrow night.
    Panelists include Susan Glasser from The Washington Post, Kate Marsh from The New Republic, Sarah Blustain from the American Prospect, Laura Helmuth from Smithsonian Magazine and Christine Chen and Kate Palmer from Foreign Policy. For more info, click here.

  • AFP reports, “‘Are you ready?’ was the message from the world’s first TV-quality online TV network, delivered at this week’s MIPCOM audiovisual trade show. The network, Joost, launched this month just ahead of a clutch of competitors that include Italy’s Babelgum, offers legal rather than pirated entertainment for free, but raises new questions about what this will mean for the massive TV business.”

  • Reuters reports, “Companies will spend a record $31 billion this year to advertise everything from toothpaste to home loans on the Internet, supporting countless news sites, social networks, video exchanges and blogs. But some media veterans worry that expectations for online advertising may be getting out-sized.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co. said Monday it joined with Tribune Co. to publish and syndicate a weekly edition of USA Today outside the United States.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think Dan Rather has totally lost it.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to national Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top-rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 16 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.” Nationally on Sunday, the Russert-moderated program
    attracted 2.991 million total viewers, a +30% advantage over ABC’s “This Week,” a +36% lead over CBS’s “Face the Nation” and +162% more than FOX “News Sunday”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, September 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demo for the 16th time this season. In addition, ‘This Week’ is the only Sunday discussion program up season-to-date (2%) and year-to-date (5%) among Total Viewers.”

  • Smithsonian Channel To Make Its Debut, But Only on DirecTV

  • Discovery Closer to Going Public

  • Deb Howell on “Protest Coverage Worth Protesting

  • And Clark Hoyt takes NYT task for MoveOn.org’s ad.

  • Random question: Will Dan Rather’s lawsuit affect whether Chris Matthews continues to have him on “The Chris Matthews Show”?

  • Today marks the launch of P.O.T.U.S. ’08 on XM Radio.

  • TV Week reports, “Commercials in high definition not only look better, they sell better. That’s the conclusion of research tied to a major upfront deal that put Starcom USA clients on Discovery Communications’ Discovery HD Theater channel.”

  • The Nation’s Marvin Kitman reports, “The launch of Katie Couric a year ago as the anchor of the CBS Evening News was hailed by CBS as the biggest thing in news since, well, the invention of denture fixative commercials. It was also the biggest flop. The CBS Evening News Without Dan Rather or Bob Schieffer had its lowest ratings since Nielsen began tracking evening news shows in 1987.”

  • “Overall media advertising spending in the U.S. dipped 0.5 percent in the first half of 2007 compared with the first half of 2006, the Nielsen Co. said” last week, reports TV Week.

  • Los Angeles Times reports beginning last week, “season premiere episodes of seven Fox Broadcasting programs will be made available for free through Apple’s iTunes store, a move that highlights the TV industry’s race to harness the Internet and try out potential business partners.”

  • E&P reports, “The Newspaper Association of America is launching a contest that asks teens to create a YouTube video showing how they use newspapers in print or online.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Industry speculation has it that CBS might seek a quick financial settlement to avoid the spectacle of its former star taking depositions from its top brass. But [Dan] Rather dismissed that notion.” Rather “said he’ll give a ‘substantial’ portion of the money to journalism groups if he wins, reports the New York Daily News.

  • “It’s been a while since the debate over Iraq policy was the nation’s top talk show topic. But the Iraq doubters drove the suddenly re-ignited conversation on the airwaves last week. Meanwhile, the strange saga of Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick and his dog fighting operation proved a difficult topic to tackle,” according to the Pew Talk Show Index.

  • DMNews reports, “While circulation numbers continue to fall for large metro paid dailies, free papers are stepping in to meet the needs of the younger urban demographic.”

  • Last week, Google “released a free software tool that allows Google AdWords advertisers to create their own Google Print Ads for display in newspapers,” reports Information Week.

  • Poynter Online’s Amy Gahran writes, “I figured I should check out what NYTimes.com is doing in terms of online advertising, now that they’ve finally let go of the subscriber-wall model. The answer — at least from a quick perusal — was disappointing. NYTimes.com seems to still be relying mainly on large, generic banner ads that are mostly irrelevant to page content.”

  • Check out Public Eye’s Matthew Felling’s take on Dan Rather’s lawsuit against CBS/Viacom.

  • C-SPAN announced the re-design of www.campaignnetwork.org, the political network of record’s website specializing in Campaign 2008.

  • Qorvis’s Quin Hillyer has some fun with a “Fact Check” story in the Washington Post.

  • Don’t miss the upcoming deadlines for the National Press Foundation’s annual awards entries. Check out details here.

  • “During the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference, federal shield laws will be debated during a panel discussion. Serving on the panel are Randall Eliason, a professor from American University; Eve Burton, general counsel for Hearst Corp; Jim Taricani, a reporter at WJAR who was held in contempt of court, and Bruce Sanford, an attorney for Baker Hostetler. Mike Walter, an anchor with WUSA will moderate the panel. The event will take place at 10 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Ticonderoga room.” For more info, click here.
  • B&C reports, “The endorsement of stars like Oprah Winfrey, Jon Stewart or even Tiger Woods would not translate to any more votes and — somewhat curiously in the case of Stewart, Woods and several others — could actually hurt their chances.”

  • Asbury Park Press reports, “Technology threatens to replace traditional news sources with independent Web sites and blogs, making news gathering more democratic but raising questions about the veracity of stories, Myron Kandel, founding editor of CNN Financial News, said Thursday.”

  • New York Times reports, Michael Arrington, founder and (strong) voice of Techcrunch, an influential tech-centric blog about startups, is moving over to share his pulpit.
    Willingly. Starting Wednesday, Techcrunch will be co-edited by Erick Schonfeld, formerly an editor-at-large and blogger for the erstwhile Business 2.0 and a senior writer at Fortune Magazine.”

  • RCN announced in a release, “the company won its second consecutive Thoth Award for Investor Relations at the Public
    Relations Society of America National Capital Chapter’s 39th annual Thoth Awards Dinner at the National Press Club.”

  • John F. Sturm, president and chief executive officer of the Newspaper Association of America, writes in the Seattle Times, “Those who continue to support the 30-year-old ban on cross-ownership of newspapers and broadcast stations in the same market are living in a curious time warp — where a community’s communications consisted of a newspaper and, at best, a handful of local television and radio stations.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Federal Communications Commission members got an earful Thursday night in Chicago, the fifth of six public hearings around the country on its media-ownership rules. Much of the crowd at Rainbow/PUSH Coalition national headquarters applauded whenever panelists and speakers from the community called for less consolidation of media ownership and more minority representation on and as owners of broadcast outlets.”

  • A tipster tells us, “HD history that almost wasn’t The Presidential address to the nation made a little history when it was shot and fed out in High Definition for the first time. But about 5 minutes into the speech, NBC, the network pool (and all the other networks) lost transmission of the HD signal. They immediately replaced it with the standard definition signal, but when it came to the refeed the HD version to the networks later on, it turned out nobody had recorded it. The transmission had been lost somewhere between the White House and the NBC Washington Bureau, and what’s even worse, NBC staff at the White House hadn’t recorded it. Enter struggling HD outfit HDNews. The 24 hour national news network broadcast entirely in HD and available on Dish Network and several cable systems in the northeast. They had subscribed to the pool feed and instead of going to NBC to receive the signal, went to the White House and plugged into NBC’s White House pool drop instead. This week NBC contacted the HDNews Washington Bureau, and they were able to provide a copy to NBC and the other networks that had subscribed the Presidential HD pool speech. And thus, saving September 13th 2007 as the first Presidential Address to the nation in High Definition.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “With $12.6 billion, Anne Cox Chambers of Cox Enterprises fame is the richest American whose fortune is tied to the media industry, but that’s only if you don’t count the Internet as ‘media.’”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “When the Democratic-led Congress started debating a big Food and Drug Administration bill earlier this year, pharmaceutical companies worried that it would sharply restrict one of their most powerful sales-boosting tools — drug ads. But in the final bill, which passed the House overwhelmingly on Wednesday and the Senate last night, such marketing is largely spared. One major reason: the drug industry found powerful allies among media and advertising firms who were determined to protect one of their biggest and fastest-growing advertising categories.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable television service, and 10 other cable television providers were sued over claims their bundling of channels forces consumers to pay for services they don’t want.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “This just in, courtesy of our Anglophile-eyed British colleague, program coordinator Jacqueline Davies: Hypens are history, at least for 16,000 words deemed hyphen unworthy.”

  • “ABC is reaching beyond its Web site and iTunes with a deal to carry its prime-time shows on AOL Video. The agreement marks the first time ABC has offered its shows on an online portal. The deal also calls for ABC to syndicate its player to AOL Video,” reports TV Week.

  • EMDashes writes, “About that piece in the Voice that’s been getting a lot of press: good for them for creating something so timely and buzzworthy, and I’m wholly sincere; for many years, I never missed a copy of the paper. … Unfortunately, I can’t agree with Rose Jacobs here. It’s certainly true that the PEN World Voices Festival is an excellent series; I saw how fulfilling the events were (and how hard the small staff works) when I was at PEN, and it’s an inspiring program. But Jacobs’s accounts of two previous New Yorker Festival events, both of which I also attended — John Updike and David Remnick, in 2005, and Milos Forman and David Denby, in 2006 — puzzle me.”

  • Local freelance writer Kelly Dinardo makes Page Six!

  • The Orlando Sentinel editors try a Facebook experiment.

  • TV Week reports, “Electronic Local People Meters (LPMs) are set to be installed in 38 additional markets by 2011, the Nielsen Co. announced.”

  • Check out the latest installment of Mediabistro’s J-School Confidential.

  • Rachel Sklar writes, “Dan Rather Has Nothing To Lose”

  • Jay Rosen writes, “If I were to underline one thing about Dan Rather’s $70 million suit against CBS, it’s the theatricality of it, which is the key to understanding Rather himself.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “PBS seemed to be making news this week rather than just broadcasting it. The news revolves around two debates, officially called “forums,” for 2008 presidential candidates — one in Iowa for Democrats and one in Maryland for Republicans. Both were scheduled months ago, are being broadcast on PBS, and are taking place within days. And both, in odd and contrasting ways, have become controversial.”

  • ’60 Minutes’ clocks in for its 40th season

  • Lloyd Grove has an interview with Barry Diller, “The internet mogul speaks his mind on videogames, newspapers, and his own style of management.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ICN says moveon.org’s use of ‘Gen. Betray us’ was not original; that it may have come from a Countdown with Keith Olbermann broadcast on August 16.”

  • TV Week reports, “Cox Communications on Wednesday announced it will be adding four high-definition networks from Discovery Communications. High def simulcasts of Discovery Channel, TLC, Animal Planet and the Science Channel will be rolled out on a market-by-market basis, the company said. Customers will be able to see such shows as ‘Deadliest Catch,’ ‘Dirty Jobs’ and ‘Meerkat Manor.’”

  • Beltway Blogroll writes, “When Arianna Huffington and Jay Rosen announced their plan for OffTheBus early this year, I was excited by the prospect of a network of citizen journalists covering the 2008 presidential campaign. I even pondered the idea of volunteering as an OffTheBus professional mentor to the budding reporters. The more developments I see at OffTheBus, however, the more skeptical I become about whether it can fulfill its promise of offering ‘a wide variety of voices and perspectives” on the 2008 campaign.’

  • E&P reports, “After completing a two-year conversion of its 85 daily papers from 52-inch web size to 48-inch, Gannett Co. Inc. is conducting a national review for a possible second size cut to 44-inch web.”

  • New York Observer reports, “Blaise Zerega, Portfolio’s managing editor will be taking over the job of deputy editor–a position left vacant since the high-profile firing of Jim Impoco last month. Also, New Yorker managing editor Jacob Lewis will be joining Portfolio to fill Mr. Zerega’s role.”

  • Mary Mapes writes, “Gee, just when I was all excited about Wednesday’s big premiere of the new CBS cultural triumph Kid Nation, my old friend Dan Rather went and blew my whole evening out of the water by filing a massive lawsuit against the company. Here we go again.”

  • Stuart Taylor offers an apology “to MSNBC talk-show host Joe Scarborough and to The Post for the cutting description of Mr. Scarborough in a Sept. 7 op-ed, ‘Guilty in the Duke Case,’ by me and KC Johnson about the Duke lacrosse case. I wrote that description on the basis of transcripts of “Scarborough Country” programs early in the Duke case. My attention has since been drawn to transcripts of several subsequent programs, and I realize that Mr. Scarborough was one of the handful of journalists who deserve credit for calling attention early in the case to the emerging evidence of innocence.”

  • Brendan Nyhan writes, “Believe it or not: the AP has released a piece by Ron Fournier titled ‘Analysis: Is Edwards Real or a Phony?’ Talk about parroting Republican talking points! Can we expect an equivalent approach to covering the GOP candidates? (‘Giuliani: Sane or Crazy?’) Also, there’s an obvious epistemological problem here — Fournier can’t resolve whether Edwards is “real” or a “phony,” nor can anyone else. And this sort of character-focused coverage diverts attention from issues that Fournier can effectively address such as, well, policy.”

  • CJR writes about the Fournier piece, “one thing a political attack does need to work—whether it’s right or wrong—is for reporters to give it a thorough airing, to ensure that it gets proper traction with voters. Which is what Fournier does with today’s piece, headlined: ‘Analysis: Is Edwards Real or a Phony?’”

  • Harry Jaffe writes, “Now the Washington Post has come up with a surefire way to make its employees know they are valued cogs in the wheel of news production. Gary Corso, director of administration and operating services at the paper of Watergate fame, this week authored the following memo: ‘The Northwest cafeteria Coffee Cart is offering Post managers an opportunity to reward their employees with tickets for either a free box of popcorn or a free 16-ounce regular coffee. Tickets must be purchased in sheets of ten and can only be redeemed at the Northwest Coffee cart. The price is $11.00 for ten popcorn tickets and $15.50 for ten 16 oz. regular coffee tickets. (Taxes are included)’”

  • Real Clear Politics launched RealClearPolitics Fantasy ’08, “a market-based game for the 2008 election powered by Intrade.”

  • City Paper’s Erik Wemple writes, “Two reporters took on Vice President Dick Cheney. One of them will stay on the case.”

  • Bob and Lee Woodruff know how to draw a crowd. The boldface names will be out in full force Nov. 7 in New York City for the “Stand up for Heroes” gala. The event is a partnership between the New York Comedy Festival and the Bob Woodruff Family Fund,” reports TVNewser.

  • “FactCheck.org, the St. Petersburg Times, and the Washington Post smoke out the political BS,” writes Slate’s Jack Shafer.

  • “The Knight News Challenge is offering up to $5 MILLION for innovative ideas using digital technology to revolutionize community news!”

  • CyberSoc writes, “I started a post about social bookmarking but ended up writing about the apparent disappearance of technorati from the Washington Post’s article pages”

  • Rachel Sklar writes, “Color us not-surprised: Brian Stelter has…a blog! About TV!” Check out TV Decoder here.

    Jobs

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a paid intern.

  • The Aspen Institute is looking for a Deputy Dir of Communications and Public Affairs.

  • The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is looking for a Senior Manager, New Media Program.

  • National Association of Manufacturers is looking for a Graphic Designer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a Webmaster.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a Copy editor/page designer.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Westminster Reporter.

  • The Salisbury Daily Times is looking for a Page Designer/Copy Editor.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • C-SPAN is looking for an Assignment/Logistics Editor and a Washington Journal Producer.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Associate Producer for AAM TV.

  • The RAND Corporation is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Committees Reporter, a Video Producer, CQ Politics and a User Interface Designer & Developer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Reporter.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • ASCRS is seeking a Special Projects Editor.

  • American Chemical Society is looking for a Web Production Associate.

  • Reading Is Fundamental is looking for a Manager, Media Relations.

  • Bisnow on Business is looking for a Tech Reporter/Writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Redskins? You’re not really into it.

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News Digital increased unique visitors 19% to 9.9 million in July 2007 versus the same time last year, and ranked in ninth place in the Top 20 of general news sites, according to the Nielsen NetRatings.”

  • CNN announced in a release, “Former President Bill Clinton will appear on CNN’s Larry King Live on Wednesday, September 5, at 9 p.m. (ET) to discuss his latest book, Giving: How Each Of Us Can Change The World.”

  • This week, the Washington Journal will focus on 5 major cities and their issues. Each day, they will first talk with the city’s mayor about the economic and political issues facing their areas. They started yesterday in Dallas and today they are in Detroit. Tomorrow — Miami.

  • Dana Bash knows her Seinfeld.

  • Watching Matt Drudge

  • Jeff Gannon looks at Dana Milbank and asks, “Why does anyone take him seriously?”

  • Deborah Howell on “How to have your say.”

  • Why are we showing you this? Because it’s the funniest thing we’ve seen in a long time.

  • According to the Pew News Interest Index, “For the second week in a row, the plight of six miners trapped in a Utah mine dominated public interest.”

  • Reuters reports, “The presidential election is 14 months away and with as many as 17 candidates now running, U.S. television and radio broadcasters are elated at the prospect of billions more in advertising dollars.”

  • There are only 10 days left to take advantage of Mediabistro’s Back to School Sale. The deadline is Friday, August 31. Take any online class starting in September and get a Mediabistro On Demand video for free. Get details here.

  • Michael Silence on knoxnews.com raises the question of “Proper attribution on blogs”

  • Ed Driscoll.com reports that Technortati has reached 100 million blogs.

  • Huffington Post reports, “MSNBC Victimized by Even Faker Source of Fake News”

  • Media Matters reports, “O’Reilly asserted ‘most journalists give money to Democrats’ — but study on subject refutes him”

  • TMZ.com reports, “Alleged Mom Beater Gets Testy with Reporter”

  • Think Progress reports, “Fox News and the CBC Institute have decided to postpone their planned Sept. 23 Democratic presidential debate in Detroit. The CBC Institute explained in a statement that the ‘overwhelming number of party presidential debates has created a scheduling challenge.’”

  • Lloyd Grove is now a columnist for Portfolio.

  • Christian Science Monitor takes a look at Omar Fekeiki, an Iraqi intern for the Washington Post. “It was two weeks into his Washington Post internship when the difference between life here and life in Iraq — the different value placed on death, and in turn, life — became startlingly apparent.”

  • E&P reports, “In a decade-plus of Web exploration, nearly every daily has felt the growing pains that any new news tool requires.”

  • His Extreme-ness tell us, “Why C-SPAN Is Better Than Nancy Grace And Dennis Hopper Combined”

  • The Age’s Rachel Buchanan writes, “the closed universe of the newspaper office, those trade-based temples to type where printers and proofreaders and journos could all sit down in a staff canteen and eat the same awful food together, is vanishing. Did we journalists miss this story because it is our own?”

  • Laura Sessions Stepp has an article in the latest Cosmopolitan, Feministing reports.

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple writes, “The Washington Post goes on, and on, and on about the lazy, hazy days of August.”

  • PBS Ombudsman Mike Getler reports, “Over the last many years, reporters have grown fond of the once-secret tape recordings of White House conversations made by former President Richard Nixon. They are sometimes jokingly referred to as ‘the gift that keeps on giving,’ not just because each new batch that gets released is likely to reveal something new, but because they almost always produce stories and give journalists and commentators something to write about. I’m beginning to think the same way about Bill Moyers and his weekly Journal on PBS.”

  • Woodruff Chronicles Senator’s Recovery

  • Web 2.Oh…really? writes, “The folks at CNN have figured out what editors of newspapers figured out by the 1920s or so but then (how?) forgot when they made the transition to the Web: People skim the news, scanning headlines, decks, picture/captions, and reading (sometimes) ledes and (rarely) the story to the jump and (very rarely indeed) all the way to the end.”

  • Slate asks, “Do soldiers have free speech rights?”

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a just-released study, SNL Kagan estimates that 84% of the US population, including consumer, business and double users, will have mobile phones by the end of 2007, with this percentage surging past 100% by 2013.”

  • Reuters Health reports, “People who spend more pre-bedtime hours using the Internet or watching television are more likely to report that they don’t get enough sleep, even though they sleep almost as long as people who spend fewer pre-bedtime hours in front of a computer or television screen, survey findings show.”

  • From a reader and GW alum: “Cover of city paper is why gw is so expensive. One reason: full page gw ad on page nine. Thanks for spending my money well, oh alma mater.”

  • Time’s Mark Halperin is on CBN.com. Watch Halperin on Hillary Clinton here and Halperin on The Power of Drudge here.

  • “Join Reason, MTV’s Kurt Loder, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters, Fox News Channel’s Judge Andrew P. Napolitano, SEC Commissioner Paul Atkins, Lynn Scarlett, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior, and numerous others at ‘Reason in DC’ at the Ritz Carlton, October 26th and 27th. The event will also feature a launch party for Reason.tv, Reason’s new video journalism project featuring The Price Is Right and Power of 10 host Drew Carey. For registration details and more information, please click here.”

  • Dana Perino was on NPR this weekend, defending one of the first dogs, Barney. A hilarious exchange ensued:

      MR. SAGAL: Alright, well. Dana, so — and we know that you, unlike Mr. Rove, are still employed at the White House — and we ask you this: Is Barney, in fact a lump?

      MS. PERINO: I wouldn’t call him a lump. Of course, you’re right, Karl is on his way out the door. Look, Barney’s kind of standoffish, but he’s got personality. He’s got a little bit of sass. You know, I don’t think — he doesn’t let people get too close to him.

      MR. SAGAL: What does Barney think about Rove?

      MS. PERINO: Well, I did see one thing last week when we were down in Texas. In fact it was actually more Ms. Beasley. They alternated from wanting to be petted by him to growling at him. So it was maybe a love/hate relationship.

      KYRIE O’CONNOR: So Karl didn’t have to, like, carry the pooper-scooper or anything?

      MS. PERINO: No, that job is reserved for other people. Like me.

      MR. SAGAL: Really?

      MS. PERINO: Well, I do deal with — I deal with the press a lot.

    Touche Dana. Touche

  • Poynter Online reports, “This week Congressional Quarterly and the St. Petersburg Times launched Politifact, a refreshing approach to campaign coverage that pulls the rhetoric apart into components that can be examined, analyzed, and compared.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “A high-calorie tradition that started in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks is still going strong at cnn’s Washington HQ thanks to the sweet tooth of Larry King Live senior editorial producer Carol Buckland. Surrounded by harried and hungry colleagues covering 9/11, she decided to bake some brownies one day and has been hauling in the treats every Monday since. … Newsman Wolf Blitzer is her biggest fan: ‘If left unchecked, I could become a cookie monster.’”

  • Media Life reports, “When readers think of their newspapers, one of the last things they think about is design. Newspapers are utilities, information delivery systems. Delivery systems need to work, not look pretty. Newspaper editors especially have stuck with that notion, resisting all but the most minor redesigns. Suddenly, all this is changing. What’s likely coming is a period of dramatic change in newspaper design.”

  • A reader points us to this from Thursday’s Last Call: “And speaking of the Watergate, we have a mouse.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Rupert Murdoch doesn’t yet own the Wall Street Journal, but he’s already flexing his muscles. In the last two weeks, the chairman of News Corp. has called at least three reporters who were considering leaving the top financial publication and asked them to stay, people familiar with the calls said Thursday.”

  • Mercury News reports, “Craig Newmark, founder of the eponymous craigslist classified site, had left his creation behind, the Silicon Valley gossip blog reported Thursday.”

  • NewsBusters Noel Sheppard writes, “As the new season of HBO’s ‘Real Time’ began Friday night, I watched with great trepidation, especially given host Bill Maher’s disgraceful special on that network back in July wherein he spent virtually two-thirds of the program bashing President Bush and anyone with an “R” next to his/her name.”

    More fallout from Salon’s FishbowlDC Hottest Media Types article

  • From Knoxnews.com: “Media credibility takes another hit”

  • And from Reason: “Revenge of the Nerds”

  • Yet some more hotness coverage, this time from Freakonomics.

    Conservatives continue to hammer away at TNR over the “Baghdad Diarist”

  • From Pajamas Media: “TNR Targets Bill Kristol, NOT Pajamas Media”

  • From The Corner: “… that apparently has become Sullivan’s modus operandi — in frenzied fashion to toss out slurs and then to grow silent when they are refuted.”

  • From Classical Values: “Confabulation of fabulism?”

  • From Confederate Yankee: “A Sorry State of Affairs”

  • From Roger L. Simon: “Changing the story when you’re under attack is such an overused and obvious technique that you’d think people would be embarrassed to employ it. But not Jonathan Chait at The New Republic who jumps into the fray with a largely ad hominem attack on William Kristol in order to deflect criticism of TNR in the ongoing Scott Beauchamp scandal.”

  • From Hugh Hewitt: “The journalistic Romper Room that is The New Republic has belched forth another seminal piece that future historians will use to chart the once great magazine’s decline into extinction.”

  • Slate reports, “Andrew Sullivan excoriates pundits who exhibited ‘spectacular misjudgment about the war in Iraq,’ something that he says ‘should consign the author to irrelevance.’”

  • From NonParty Politics: “Andrew Sullivan: Blaming Everyone But Beauchamp

    Jobs

  • American Federation of Government Employees is looking for a Communication Specialist.

  • “Save the Bay” Chesapeake Bay Foundation seeks a Virginia Media & Communications Assistant.

  • Susan Davis International is looking for a New Media Director.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director, Operations, News & Administration, a Director, Afternoon Programming, a Director, Morning Programming, a Deputy Managing Editor, News & Information
    and a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend All Things Considered.

  • The Washington Times is looking for a Content Producer.

  • U.S. News & World Report magazine is looking for an Investing/Personal Finance Reporter.

  • The Washington Post is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • Patrick Henry College is looking for a Journalism Professor.

  • The Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • The News and Advance is looking for a Reporter.

  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education is seeking a Magazine Editor.

  • Oxfam America is looking for a Press Officer.

  • The Townsend Group is looking for a National Sales Manager.

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Managing Editor/Technology.

  • Dana Press is looking for a Production Director.

  • Fox News Channel is looking for an Associate Producer, Weekend Live.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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