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Interviews

Capital New York’s Sexiest 60-Second Interview Yet

CapitalProLogoOne of the features of Capital New York’s brand new “Media Pro” morning newsletter is something called The 60-Second Interview. Participants so far have included Curbed CEO Lockhart Steele, Hollywood Reporter editorial director Janice Min, former FishbowlNY editor Rachel Sklar and, today, Glenn Beck.

The Daily Caller got a kick out of the fact that present in today’s e-mail version was the editorial annotation [CUT?] ahead of The Blaze founder’s praise of I Love Lucy (Beck’s Ricky Ricardo praise was indeed excised from the Web side). Meanwhile, at The Blaze end, assistant editor Erica Ritz seems to have felt the need to confirm to her readers that the conversation is not a hoax:

Glenn Beck told Capital New York in a “60-second interview” that he actually admires a number of reporters from the mainstream media.

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Hamish Hamilton On What It’s Like to Direct the VMAs

HamishHamiltonAs a live event director and producer, Hamish Hamilton has been behind some of the most watched shows in history. He recently directed the Super Bowl XLVII Halftime Show, the 2013 VMAs (aka Miley Twerk-Gate) and the Victoria’s Secret fashion show.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Hamilton explains how he prepares for these enormous productions, and what happens behind the scenes:

At the 2013 VMAs we had the most disastrous, monumental technical breakdown 30 minutes before we went on air. The entire stage, which was supposed to rotate 360 degrees, became jammed. We were faced with the very real possibility there would be no show. It was one of those moments that’s kind of a nightmare; something you think isn’t ever going to happen. I just went cold. But you just deal with it. You know, when you have a lot of really great people thinking calmly, out of the box, and working as a team to do something difficult, that’s very important. It’s actually bizarre because a lot of people don’t even notice, the program isn’t usually affected — and we had Miley Cyrus and the twerking incident, which kind of overshadowed everything!

To hear more about how he manages the pressures of such huge productions, read: So What Do You Do Hamish Hamilton, Director Of Some Of The World’s Biggest Televised Events?

Artie Lange on Overcoming ‘Toughest’ of All Addictions – Heroin

TheFixlogoSince Artie Lange miraculously walked himself back from the edge of the abyss, he has been doing a lot of interviews about his life and new book. But there’s likely no more apt a place to find the one-time Howard Stern sidekick talking about his hard-fought recovery from heroin and other addictions than The Fix.

The website, which focuses on the issues of addiction and recovery, relaunched this week after taking a summer break. Overseeing these efforts is newly installed publisher and CEO Jay Levin, who previously founded LA Weekly.

The Fix plans to post at least five new features per week, along with a similar amount of personal essays and eight news items. Here’s Lange’s answer to the first question from The Fix contributor McCarton Ackerman – Where are you in your sobriety these days?:

“I’ve have had two relapses in the last 18 months, but have been clean for three months now. The last relapse was from painkillers I was taking for an injury. They were given to me by a doctor, but I didn’t take them as prescribed and finished a month’s prescription in about a day and a half. I got to a meeting and stopped myself, but I would definitely consider that to be a relapse.”

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Senior Editor of MAD on Pitching the Magazine

JoeRaiolaJoe Raiola has a job many covet, and few could imagine: He’s one of a handful of full-timers in charge of MAD magazine. He’s also created one of only two officially sanctioned John Lennon tribute concerts. Along with his radio appearances and stand up comedy work, Raiola has been with MAD magazine for 28 years. He insists that working there shouldn’t be considered a proper job: “If you mature, you get fired. It’s a place where you stay perpetually young or silly or both.”

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Raiola talks about The Beatles’ MAD connection, the atmosphere at mag’s headquarters and his first pitching experience:

What advice do you have for readers interested in pitching MAD?
MAD has always been freelance written. We’re always looking for new talent and new writers. Pitching stuff to us now is pretty easy; you can do it via our website. And we’re actually foolish enough to review everything that comes in. Writers don’t need to include illustrations. When I sold to MAD for the first time in 1984, I didn’t have any skills as an artist at all. I suggested a couple of art notes and had some ideas as to how I thought something could be done, but that was about it.

To learn more about Raiola, including info on his upcoming performance in New York, read: So What Do You Do: Joe Raiola, MAD Senior Editor and John Lennon Tribute Executive Producer?

Jozen Cummings on How He Became the NY Post‘s Dating Reporter

JozenCummings

It’s safe to say Jozen Cummings never imagined he’d become a professional matchmaker of sorts. The former arts and entertainment writer is now a dating reporter for The New York Post‘s Meet Market column, where he sets up singles on blind dates in New York City.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Cummings discusses what it’s like setting up blind dates for strangers, the accidental success of his blog and how he scored his dream job:

Your background is in arts and entertainment, so how did you end up a dating reporter?
It was the first job that I ever got where I went in not knowing anyone. But when I saw the opening for Meet Market, I said “This is the job for me. This is the job I want.” I know that people know about my blog, but I never use it as a way to sell myself or my qualifications. I still feel strongly about this: you want a professional job, you’ve got to show the most professional work that you possibly can. So none of my clips were dating-related or anything like that. But I knew that it would help to show that I care a lot about this topic of dating, so I did send a link to my blog. Kind of like a bowtie.

To hear more about his writing process and how he cultivated an audience for his blog, read: So What Do You Do, Jozen Cummings, Blogger And Dating Columnist For The New York Post?

– Aneya Fernando

Soledad O’Brien On Pursuing Stories She Believes In

SoledadOBrien

Soledad O’Brien has embarked on a new journey, and she couldn’t be happier about it. The former CNN morning anchor recently launched Starfish Media Group, a multiplatform company dedicated to uncovering empowering stories from around the world.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, O’Brien discusses the challenges of starting her own company, her thoughts of the current state of cable news and the importance of pursuing stories that remain uncovered by the mainstream media:

You’ve said that Starfish Media Group allows you to explore topics that you care deeply about. How would a broader adoption of that model affect journalism as a whole?
In a way, I think what you’re seeing already among viewers is that exact model. People are interested in things not necessarily covered by the mainstream media, so they download things online. The categories are growing because people find out that they’re not able to get information about stories that are of interest to them on the evening news. So I think that’s already in place and it’s only going to become more so….I think that there’s a sense of “I have a story to tell” or “I would like to see my story reflected” somewhere, especially in a nation that’s more and more demographically diverse.

To get career tips from O’Brien and more info on her company, read: So What Do You Do, Soledad O’Brien, CEO of Starfish Media Group?

– Aneya Fernando

Scott Moore on How His Career Led Him to Deepak and Oprah

ScottMoore

Scott E. Moore has quite the resume: He’s an accomplished musician with five solo albums under his belt and has worked for big networks like MTV/VH1, TNT and Turner Movie Classics as a director and producer. For the past five years, Moore has been the creative director of a site that provides visual medical information.

He just completed his latest project — creating two hours of original music for Deepak Chopra and Oprah Winfrey‘s 21- Day Meditation Challenge. In the latest Mediabistro feature, Moore explains how he came to be a part of the project:

So how did you go from creating videos for TheVisualMD to working on Deepak and Oprah’s Meditation Challenge?
Deepak was one of our colleagues on a project on the physiological science of emotional bonding between mother and infant. An old colleague who was working with Deepak on this meditation challenge told me they wanted to raise it up a couple of notches. Even though a lot of people participated, the product wasn’t at the quality level they felt it should be… So the person who handles the Chopra Center Digital Properties was in a crisis. And I just so happened to have just started my agency, and this project would be right up my alley. Ironically, I had started playing atmospheric, soul music live in a yoga studio, which would sell out every month. I played Deepak some of that music, and that’s when it all kind of came full circle and I got the opportunity to do this project.

To hear more about Moore’s eclectic career, read: Hey, How’d You “Score” That Job With Deepak and Oprah, Filmmaker Scott E. Moore?

– Aneya Fernando

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How Bloggers Are Making More Money Thanks to Quarterly.Co

MitchLowe

Mitch Lowe, co-founder of Netflix and former president of Redbox, has now set his sights on a new type of company. He is the CEO of Quarterly.Co, a subscription service that lets people receive physical items in the mail from influential contributors of their choice.

Recent contributors include Marie Claire creative director Nina Garcia, rapper and producer Pharrell Williams, Bill Nye The Science Guy and Gretchin Rubin, a New York Times best-selling author.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Lowe spoke about what media personalities can gain from becoming contributors:

How do you think the journalists, authors, bloggers or the media outlets themselves benefit from participating?

In a couple ways. The revenue is one. Right now they get a substantial percentage of the profits. And in addition, they are able to build their fan base and their brand in a whole new way, in a way that’s not currently possible to do. In addition, many of them participate in some of the products — they might own or they might be a sponsor of some of the products that they put in there — so they benefit because our subscribers are highly influential people. I can’t tell you the names of people, but they are people who anybody would love to have their products in the hands of.

To hear more about Lowe, read: So What Do You Do, Mitch Lowe, Co-Founder of Netflix and CEO of Quarterly.Co?

– Aneya Fernando

WaPo Columnist Is ‘Really Encouraged’ by Jeff Bezos

MichelleSingletary

Michelle Singletary, the personal finance guru, has truly seen it all. She has worked in radio, once hosted her own TV show (the now defunct Singletary Says) and currently writes “The Color of Money” column for the Washington Post, which is syndicated in more than 100 newspapers around the country.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Singletary talks about the state of newspapers, how she connects with readers and what she thinks of the paper’s new owner, Jeff Bezos:

He came and spoke to the newsroom, and I was pleasantly surprised. He was very down-to-earth. He doesn’t come off as being elitist. He’s just a really nice guy. He said a lot of things that agreed with my philosophy on how to deal with our customer base, which is primarily our readers. And he spent a lot of time talking about how we need to make our readers the center focus of what we do, even saying that may not necessarily win us Pulitzers, but it will win us with our readers and our customer base — and that’s what’s going to make us survive. So I’m really encouraged.

For more on the paper’s sale and advice on how to make it in media, read: So What Do You Do, Michelle Singletary, WaPo Columnist and Finance Guru?

– Aneya Fernando

Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer: ‘It’s All About Trust’

Jamie-McCarthy_crop

Jamie McCarthy has a job that many people (photographers and non-photographers alike) would kill for: He gets to rub elbows with celebrities and take pictures of them. McCarthy’s been in the industry for 17 years, snapping hundreds of celebrities and getting to know them on a personal level, too.

The photographer was mentored by his uncle, the legendary celebrity and nightlife photographer Patrick McMullan. They worked together for eight (somewhat tumultuous) years before McCarthy decided to give his solo career a shot. He now works for both WireImage and Getty Images.

McCarthy recently spoke with FishbowlNY editor Richard Horgan about his favorite clients, surprising reactions to his work, the ubiquitous TMZ and why building trust with celebrities is essential. Here’s an excerpt:

Has the rise of TMZ affected the way you do your job?
Not really. My team of photographers at Getty, we’re kind of like the anti-TMZ. We’re the guys that are pretty much on the inside. So we’re the guys who want to do the nice photos and make them look good, whereas TMZ and those guys I feel like they’re looking more for the dirt on celebrities. My clients hire me because they know they can trust me and I’m not going to give up secrets about them and I make them look good. I want people who see the photos to say, ‘Wow, she looks beautiful’ or ‘He’s great-looking.’ Also, I only shoot at events where people are expecting photographs to be taken. I’ve never tried to shoot people in their personal lives. That’s not my style.

To learn more about McCarthy and his work, read So What Do You Do, Jamie McCarthy, Celebrity Photographer?

Aneya Fernando

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