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Posts Tagged ‘Dean Baquet’

New York Times on Publishing Government Leaks: ‘That’s Our Job’

The New York Times has recently come under fire by members of Congress for publishing stories that they felt compromised national security. As Politico notes, when the Times ran stories on President Obama’s “kill list” and backing of cyber attacks, John Kerry said “there is a serious question whether or not [the Times articles] served our interest and whether the public had to know.” Others Senators who called out the Times include John McCain, Peter King and Lindsay Graham. The Times’ Dean Baquet was quick to defend the paper.

“Both the rise and use of drones, and the increased use of cyberwarfare, are the kinds of issues that we have a public service mission to surface so they can be part of a national debate,” Baquet, the paper’s managing editor, told The Huffington Post. “That’s our job.”

Baquet went on to nail the Times’ critics for, well, for doing what politicians do best. “I wonder if only Washington is having the debate about [the stories'] timing, as opposed to what they actually said,” he pondered.

In Rising to Top, Jill Abramson’s Weakness Became a Strength

(Via Marie Claire)

In today’s New Yorker profile of Jill Abramson, it’s revealed that when it came time to name a replacement for Bill Keller at the New York Times, Abramson was seen as the frontrunner by Publisher Arthur Sulzberger. However, it was Abramson’s infamous assertiveness that ended up sealing the deal.

After Sulzberger had narrowed down his choices to three candidates — Abramson, Dean Baquet, and the editor of the Boston Globe, Martin Baron — he had dinner with each individually.

It was at this time that Abramson’s frankness separated her from the pack:

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Dick Stevenson Named New York Times’ Political Editor

Dick Stevenson has been named Political Editor, a new desk at The New York Times. According to Politico, Stevenson will divide his time between D.C. and here. Here’s a snippet of the memo sent out to Times staffers:

As head of a newly formed Political Desk, Dick will be focused entirely on our campaign coverage. He will have two deputies, Gerry Mullany and Paul Volpe. In addition to overseeing the full-time political reporters and editors, Dick will be something of a collaborator-in-chief, closely coordinating with the Washington Bureau and other desks involved in political coverage.

Stevenson will report to Jill Abramson, Dean Baquet and John Geddes.

David Leonhardt to be New York Times’ Washington Bureau Chief

David Leonhardt is expected to be named the New York Times’ Washington Bureau Chief, according to PoliticoDean Baquet, the current Washington Bureau Chief, will become Managing Editor under Jill Abramson, reports The Huffington Post.

Leonhardt has been with the Times since 1999, and is well-respected by his colleagues. Already, speculation has begun that Leonhardt will one day become Executive Editor, following the same path that Abramson took.

Abramson is expected to make a formal announcement some time today.

UPDATE:
It’s official.

Bill Keller Steps Down as New York Times Editor

Bill Keller is stepping down as Executive Editor of the New York Times to become a full-time writer for the paper. He will be replaced by Jill Abramson, who has been managing editor since 2003. Abramson will be the first woman to be editor in the paper’s 160-year history.

Dean Baquet, the Washington bureau chief, will become the new managing editor. The Times reports that:

Mr. Keller, who ran the newsroom during eight years of great journalistic distinction but also declining revenue and cutbacks throughout the industry, said that with a formidable combination in place to succeed him, he felt it was a good time to step aside…

As for Mr. Keller’s plans, he said he was still working out the details of a column he will write for the paper’s new Sunday opinion section, which will be introduced later this month. He did rule one project out. “I won’t be writing a book about The New York Times,” he said.

Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the paper’s publisher, said he accepted Mr. Keller’s resignation “with mixed emotions.”

The New York Times’ ‘Week in Review’ Inches Closer to Relaunch

If you’re curious about what the revamped “Week in Review” section will look like for The New York Times when it gets an overhaul, today The Huffington Post offers up some information.

The relaunch is supposedly planned for next month, and a couple of the changes include a possible name change to “Sunday Review,” and more space for columnists. There’s also some juicy gossip mixed in with this news:

Times watchers see the new section as an opportunity for [Andy] Rosenthal to assume a bigger role within the paper. Rosenthal, a favorite of Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., is on the shortlist – along with managing editor Jill Abramson and Washington bureau chief Dean Baquet – to succeed executive editor Bill Keller when he hits mandatory retirement age in about three years.

We should have titled this post “A Power Play on Sunday.”

Washington Times Editor Fights Back Against NYT‘s Anti-Obama Allegations

nytimes814.jpgA story on the front page of The New York Times today about opposition to President Obama’s health care proposals linked one “stubborn yet false” rumor about the alleged “death panels” back to The Washington Times:

“The specter of government-sponsored, forced euthanasia was raised as early as Nov. 23, just weeks after the election and long before any legislation had been drafted, by an outlet decidedly opposed to Mr. Obama, The Washington Times.”

But TWT Executive Editor John Solomon is fighting back against the accusation that his publication is “decidedly opposed” to the president and his administration. In a memo obtained by our sister blog FishbowlDC, Solomon said his paper’s objectivity should not be called in to question simply because of the “voice of its editorial pages.”

“Our news pages have no agenda except to accurately and fairly cover the news, including that made by the administration,” Solomon said.

Solomon said his newsroom was “doing factual and fair reporting” and challenged the New York Times to prove that the Washington Times was not producing “a fair, balanced, accurate and compelling news report every day.” He also requested an apology from the New York paper.

Read the whole memo here.

Update: Later on Friday, the Solomon sent out a second memo claiming the New York Times “formally called to apologize and will be running a correction in tomorrow’s paper.”

“The Times‘ Washington bureau chief, Dean Baquet, wanted me to personally pass along his apology,” Solomon told his staff. “He also shared these words with David Jones: ‘I would never say your paper has been anything but absolutely fair and objective to Obama.’ We agree and accept the Times‘ apology.”

Iseman Drops Lawsuit Against NYT

20mccain-190a.jpgFinally! A piece of good news for the folks at The New York Times. Seems that lobbyist, and friend of John McCain, Vicki Iseman has dropped her defamation lawsuit against the Times (perhaps she took a look at the company’s current stock prices and concluded it wasn’t worth the effort). Over at Politico Michael Calderone got his hands on the memo Washington bureau chief Dean Baquet sent out to staff:

To the staff,

Vicki Iseman has dropped her lawsuit against The Times, just weeks after it was filed. We paid no money. We did not apologize. We did not retract one word of the story, which was a compelling chapter in the tale of Senator John McCain and his political rise.

The story stands as a powerful examination of a presidential candidate who cast himself as an ethics reformer and scourge of special interests, yet seemed blind at times over the course of his career to appearances of conflicts of interest.

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Former LAT Editors Speak Out

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Los Angeles Magazine speaks to five former editors of the LAT about what the paper was like then – and where it’s going today. The overall picture is as grim as you’d expect: The good old days are good and dead and the industry is headed to hell in a handbasket. All that. Funny thing is, we remember some of these guys, and there were as many gripes during their tenures as now.

Shelby Coffey III for instance can wax poetic all day about the “tremendously stimulating time” he had as editor-in-chief from ’89-’97 and all the bureaus and new editions that were added under his watch. But let’s not forget that many of those bureaus were ghosts towns by ’95 populated by quasi-legally employed “stringers.”

Michael Parks seems to benefit the most from 20/20 hindsight, even offering his perspective of how he’d run the paper in today’s climate: “You have to get more imaginative in your coverage choices. The Los Angeles Times should not run and hunt with The New York Times and The Washington Post. It’s sui generis. It needs to be reported, written, and edited for the people of Southern California.” He doesn’t mention any other innovative ways to increase the paper’s funding. We’re guessing that’s a sore subject.

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Editor Jim O’Shea Out at LA Times

That nice Jim O’Shea is gone from the LA Times, after what seems like only a few months. Quiet guy, kept to himself. The paper said so:

For the past few weeks, there has been a lot of internal Times gossip about O’Shea’s seeming distance from the newsroom operation. Basically, some people thought he wasn’t there even when he was there.

O’Shea had been in the top job for only 15 months, and was fired for resisting more of those budget cuts, just like his predecessor, Dean Baquet. While these proposed cuts weren’t as drastic as the previous, only about $4 million, out of a budget of $120 million, David Hiller canned O’Shea for his reluctance. O’Shea was said to have concerns about the paper’s ability to cover both the presidential election and the Beijing Olympics.

Spring Streetologists will note that this the fourth departure of a high ranking editor or publisher in three years.

Greg Mitchell, the editor of Editor & Publisher magazine, notes how closely this follows The Wire.

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