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Posts Tagged ‘magazines’

Magazine Newsstand Sales Suffer

WorldNewsstandAccording to the Alliance for Audited Media’s (AAM) latest report, magazines continue to struggle on the newsstand. Single copy newsstand sales dropped 11 percent during the second half of 2013, as did paid subscriptions (down 1.2 percent) and total circulation (down 1.7 percent).

Fashion and women’s magazines fared the worst during the last six months of 2013. Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Vogue, Seventeen and People Stylewatch all saw newsstand sales drop by 20 percent or more.

It wasn’t all bad news for single copy sales. New York (up 55 percent), Condé Nast Traveler (+44 percent), Men’s Fitness (+20 percent), HGTV Magazine (+15 percent) and Time (+11 percent) all enjoyed a good end to the year.

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Bonnie Fuller Talks Digital Media, Celebrity Journalism and Her First Big Break

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bonnie-fuller_149Bonnie Fuller, the veteran editor who has reinvented many major women’s mags, from Marie Claire and Cosmopolitan to Glamour and Us Weekly, is the founding president and editor-in-chief of the entertainment-news site HollywoodLife.com.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do – our first interview in the “Digital Media” week of our Profit From Your Passion series – Fuller talks about transforming tabloids and handling the criticism about her career, and offers advice to aspiring celeb journos:

[You must] have digital skills because I think the world is only going to go more digital and more mobile. So if you want to have a long career in this business, you have to be prepared to have those skills. The second thing would be that every rule used in normal journalism should be applied to celebrity journalism. Just because you’re dealing with celebrities and news about celebrities doesn’t mean you don’t apply a high standard.

For more from Fuller, including how she successfully overhauled so many top mags, read: So What Do You Do, Bonnie Fuller, Editor-In-Chief of HollywoodLife.com? Also, below, watch a video of Fuller discussing how she got her first big break.

Showcase Your Creativity at This Historic Mag

SaturdayEveningPostSeeing as The Saturday Evening Post has been around for almost 300 years, one would assume the pub would become stale and archaic at some point. But no, this storied mag has evolved with time, and currently reports on the most important happenings in society, art, travel and culture.

The pub is 80 percent freelance written. So what kind of writing are the editors looking for? One word springs to mind: creativity.

[Steve Slon, editor-in-chief] is looking for intriguing features. Got an in with a hard-to-reach celebrity? Pitch a profile and watch your odds of landing a byline increase dramatically. Most important, though, is a spark of creativity that goes beyond basic (boring) journalism. “A good reporter is a good reporter, and certainly we need stories like that,” Slon said. “But I’m looking for someone who can bring something — a little depth, a little perception, a little more to the table than simply calling the top three experts in the field and reporting back.”

To hear more tips, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: The Saturday Evening Post.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Achieve Financial Security as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerFreelance writing isn’t an obvious route to monetary success. Many people choose to freelance because they want to pursue their passion, and making boatloads of money isn’t really the goal. But what if you could do what you love — and make a killing at the same time?

Our latest Mediabistro feature discusses various tips and tricks on how to score major moolah on your next assignment. Seeking out new markets is a great way to expand your repertoire and make new connections:

“Writers think that if they want to make a lot of money they have to pitch the biggest magazines because they pay the most,” said [Linda Formichelli, author and co-founder of the Renegade Writer blog]. But, she warns, those are so difficult to break into that “not many people make a living writing only for the consumer magazines.” As a veteran freelancer, she has shifted her writing focus to include trade (business-to-business) and custom publications (like the ones you get from your credit card or insurance company). It’s a strategy she suggests for other writers who want to earn more cash, too.

To hear more tips on how to earn a major paycheck as freelancer, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Keija Minor, Editor-in-Chief of Brides, on Her Legacy

keija-minor2Keija Minor has gone through quite a few career reinventions in her life. She started out as a corporate lawyer, decided it wasn’t her passion, and then took a major pay cut to became an intern at a startup magazine, Travel Savvy. Boy, did it pay off. Minor went from intern to EIC in three years, then, after stints at Niche Media and Uptown magazine, on to Condé Nast, where she is currently editor-in-chief of Brides.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Minor talks about taking a leap of faith in her career, her advice for freelancers pitching to Brides and her unique position at the top:

You are the first African American to hold a top title at a Condé Nast publication. Is that something you think about?
I think the industry has been changing generally just over the years, as all of corporate America has been changing, to some degree, to reflect more women and more diversity. I think with the title at Condé, you know, it’s fun to be the first. It’s exciting to be the first in any sort of category, and it’s an honor. But I don’t wake up every day thinking, ‘Okay, you’re the first black woman to hold this title.’ I think about, ‘What are you going to do to move the magazine forward?’ At the end of the day, yes, I will have been the first, but I also want to be the woman who knocks it out of the park as an editor.

To hear more from Minor, including what she thinks of Anna Wintour, read: So What Do You Do Keija Minor, Brides Editor-in-Chief?

Market Yourself as a Freelance Travel Writer

Travel writing careerTravel writing is something many freelancers fantasize about. Getting paid to travel the world and eat amazing food — where do I sign up?

Although it sounds exciting in theory, the reality of life as a travel writer is just as stressful and unglamorous as any other freelance career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer discusses the lessons she’s learned after 10 years in the business. One of the most important ones? Market yourself to death:

Years ago I joined Mediabistro’s Freelance Marketplace, and it paid dividends. Soon after I joined, the editor of an in-flight magazine contacted me via my profile, and I wrote a bi-monthly column for him for four years. I continue to be a member and update my clips regularly. You never know when an editor will be looking for a writer just like you! I also read Mediabistro’s How To Pitch articles. Not only do I look at the travel-specific magazines, but also the lifestyle titles to find out how travel pieces I have in mind might fit into their books. At the end of the day, as with all freelance writing, it’s about being innovative and finding unique perspectives on topics that have already been covered, and making the pitch.

To hear more tips on how to create a lasting travel writing career, read: Embarking On My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Freelancers, Showcase Your Investigative Skills at Mother Jones

Mother JonesMother Jones, which launched in 1976, has always been a fearless pub, focused on holding those in power accountable for their actions. The mag has evolved over the years, and now focuses on a variety of topics, including politics, the environment and business accountability.

So how can a freelancer break in to this established, revered mag? Well, it helps to form relationships with the editors and to pitch fully formed stories, instead of just ideas:

Approximately one-third of the magazine is written by freelancers, many of whom have an ongoing relationship with the magazine. “We have some freelancers that we work with pretty regularly, but we also accept pitches for people who haven’t worked with us before,” said senior editor Nick Baumann. While no sections are off limits to freelancers, the feature well publishes the most freelance work. While many mags encourage freelancers to target pitches to a specific section of the book, “the best way to pitch MoJo is to have a story, and we’ll decide on our end what section we think it’s most appropriate for,” said Baumann.

To learn more about how to get published at this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Mother Jones.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 a Word at Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is all about the joy of being a sports fan. The pub’s target demographic are boys aged 7-14, with a love of sports and a will to read.

While a majority of the content is written by in-house staffers, editors are always willing to hear new ideas from freelancers. Local stories are in demand, as are articles focusing on a niche industry. There are a few key sections of the pub which are particularly freelance friendly:

The best place for freelancers to pitch is the feature well. “We’re looking for great ideas, interesting takes that would manifest as packages or features or profiles,” says managing editor Bob Der. Features run about 1,000 words, and packages with multiple components (say, a series of features with sidebars) can run from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Packages could be thematic, such as “athletes who give back” or “environmental conservation as it relates to sports.”

For editors’ contact info and more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word and Up at This Foodie Pub

EatingWell

EatingWell strives to be the place ‘where good taste meets good health.’ This food-centric pub is all about healthy recipes, nutrition news and interesting narratives on the origins of our food.

The mag is looking for investigative pieces on nutrition and science-based articles on subjects like food sustainability. New writers who manage to break into the book often establish fruitful relationships with editors there:

Features need to be well researched and thorough; a news angle or a hook to a trend also helps. “Nourish” is an essay column about how food nourishes us in unexpected ways. It is open to top literary talent as well as new writers. Travel stories are welcomed only if they have a clear tie-in to health and come with easy recipes that meet the EatingWell nutrition guidelines. What the editors prefer are pitches in which the writer can show a personal connection to a particular locale and its cuisine.

For editors’ contact info and more tips on breaking into the book, read: How To Pitch: EatingWell.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Magazine Ad Page Decline Slows During Third Quarter

magazinesSometimes, you just have to celebrate when things go from bad to not-so-bad. Such is the case with magazine ad pages. According to PIB’s latest report, ad pages declined by only 1.8 percent during the third quarter, which is better than the drops in the first quarter (down 4.8 percent) and the second (down 4.5 percent).

The big winners of the third quarter were women’s titles, as many got a boost from their September issues. Glamour posted a 19.6 percent increase, Harper’s Bazaar jumped by 9.6 percent, and Cosmo’s ad pages went up by 7.5 percent.

Mary Berner, President and CEO of the Association of Magazine Media, summed things up by saying “This is an encouraging trend, with consistent advertising growth in magazine media across platforms.”

Now go ahead everyone, celebrate the not-so-terrible news. Just don’t drink too much. You have to work tomorrow.

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