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Consumer

THIS JUST IN: Equifax Sued by ‘God’

THIS JUST IN 2As a refresher, why do we do this column in PRNewser?

At PRNewser, we love the random tips and toolslisticles and ancillary research. However, we’ve noticed certain stories trending in the news recently: crap that just can’t be grouped with anything else other than, well, other crap.

So, you see, at times there are PR stories that don’t fit snugly in a cushy box. And this particular tale could be terrible PR: not for the big guy upstairs but for the big credit bureau downstairs.

No, this isn’t a joke. No, this isn’t a slap on the church wrist. This is real — “God” is suing credit authority bureau Equifax for taking his name in vain by refusing to believe that it’s real.  Read more

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The Multifaceted Asian Consumer Market

Uniqlo Store SoHo Mannequins1 Cropped“Overall Asia is a market in flux, with radical changes and an influx of tech and global brands. It creates a society where consumers are being pulled in different directions”, said Bernd Schmitt. Not only are there distinctions between developed and emerging Asian countries, but he noted it’s also important not to generalize or stereotype Asian consumer and cultural trends.

Schmitt’s perspective is based on extensive experience living, working and traveling throughout Asia. He’s a visiting professor at Singapore’s Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI) and professor at New York’s Columbia Business School. He recently spoke at an event in New York about his latest book, The Changing Face of the Asian Consumer. Joining him were panelists Colin Mitchell, Ogilvy & Mather’s worldwide head of planning, and Brian Buchwald, CEO/co-founder of Bomoda, a marketplace for Chinese consumers to purchase premium global brands.

The main takeaways focus on the interplay of economic, cultural, brand and market factors.

Read more

Mazda Recall Is an Arachnophobe’s Worst Nightmare

*Someone needs to give me a medal for inserting this image into this post without yielding to a complete mental breakdown

Disclaimer: This PRNewser writer is the definition of an arachnophobe — meaning, I would sooner hop into a burning car than one filled with spiders. Think that’s kind of a strange and specific example? Think again.

I learned about this bit of news via a text from a loving family member who has spent our lives demonstrating that love through acts of spider-related harassment. “Hear about the Mazda6 recall?” it read. “It’s your worst nightmare.”

According to Reuters, for the second time in three years, an eight-legged engineering challenge called the Yellow Sack Spider has caused Mazda Motor Corp to issue a major recall for Mazda6 sedans in North America; the spider, which likes the smell of gasoline (who doesn’t?) weaves a web that blocks a vent in the engine. These webs can restrict fuel flow, reducing fuel tank pressure when the emission control system releases vapors from the evaporative canister. This can put extra stress on the fuel tank, which could potentially crack and leak fuel, increasing the risk of a fire.

That’s right. Spiders are trying to blow you up. Read more

Putting ‘Real Women’ In Marketing Campaigns Is Quickly Becoming A Gimmick

betabrandTrend alert! Lots of brands are using “real women” (and “real people” in general) to sell their product.

Recently, it was Betabrand, an online retailer of crowdsourced clothing based in San Francisco, that got a lot of buzz for the campaign it launched for its latest collection. Rather than using models, the company outfitted PhDs with the new clothes.

“Our designers cooked up a collection of smart fashions for spring, so why not display them on the bodies of women with really big brains?” founder Chris Lindland told AdWeek. Sigh… sure, why not.

This isn’t the first time the brand has done this sort of thing, so the company and its founder are committed to the idea. And we’re in favor of brands using images that reflect and celebrate all the wonderful and beautiful things that women are. But what started as a cool way to showcase a product and the women who would be using it has turned into the bland and somewhat offensive thing that Lindland describes in that quote.

Read more

Autopay Sucks Because You Could Die and No One Would Care

autopayIt’s not like banks need any bad PR but thanks to always being peer pressured into putting your bills on auto pay or the mean girls will point at you and laugh, there’s some serious uncool image goings on here.

Meet Pia Farrenkopf of Pontiac, Mich. 

Well, you can’t really meet her because she’s dead. In fact, according to WXYZ-7 (ABC), Pia has been dead for possibly six years… yet, was just found this past week. Why? Damn Auto Pay! Yes, really.

Find out how after the jump…

Read more

Why Social Media Loves Domino’s Pizza (UK) and Perverts May Too

Domino’s Pizza is yum-yum-good-times food. A global brand that feeds millions of people its greatness. And then there are the randy misfits who enjoy the Domino’s brand for, shall we say, other things. 

Meet Lad Vigo, or at least, that’s what his Twitter handle says. Lad thought it would be a sage consumer decision to notify his favorite pizza chain in the UK that he just boinked a pepperoni and subsequently torched his uh, little sausage.

And the inexplicable conversation that ensued — all via Twitter — is so worth a delivery of the highest order.

Read more

Girl Scouts and Signs of the Apocalypse

Oft-times, your humble flacks at PRNewser come across a story that requires PR attention for a person or a group. However, on that peculiar occasion when mere words defy even explaining what just happened, we entrust our friends in the media to do the job for us.

Take, for example, this report from FOX 5′s Juliette Vara in San Diego about the most enormous wart on the behind of humanity to come along in a while. Dude probably swings cats around by the tail, kicks puppy dogs and would run over a unicorn just for the “points.”

Enjoy.

Most PRs Would Like To Have This Problem: ‘Flappy Bird’ Shut Down Because It Got Too Popular

flappy birdWith no promotion and little development, the mobile game “Flappy Bird” became a huge hit, getting downloaded 50 million times and making $50,000 per day in ad revenue. Dong Nguyen, a Vietnam-based developer, says he created the game in two to three days. And he was clearly caught off guard by the success of the game. Having a bit of a meltdown on Twitter, he announced this weekend that he was pulling the game.

“I am sorry ‘Flappy Bird’ users, 22 hours from now, I will take ‘Flappy Bird’ down,” Nguyen tweeted on Saturday. “I cannot take this anymore.”

Being popular is a problem most PRs would like to have. So how can they get this problem too? We have one theory.

Read more

Olympic Gold Medal or Chicken McFrankeNugget? Your Choice.

Yes, Sochi Olympic fans, there’s a new commercial that will be airing this weekend instead of that last weekend for big commercials (whatevs) showing a direct comparison between winning an Olympic Gold medal and eating a McDonald’s Chicken McNugget.

Because that’s apples to oranges, right?

In some bizarro universe where damsel in distress are ignored, Clark Kent can’t get his corpulent behind out of a phone booth, and people actually remember the Kardashians are famous because one of the sisters is just a big ho.

The Clown wants you to believe that “every Olympic victory is celebrated with a bite, just like a 20-piece Chicken McNuggets.” If you consider an Olympic victory the same as rushing for the toilet with violent diarrhea, then yes, indeed! God bless America and pass the Febreze because it’s nugget time!

We report. You decide.

This Is Why JCPenney’s Twitter Stunt Is Not Another ‘Oreo Moment’

From Vegas to Madison Avenue, everyone was looking to get in on some Super Bowl action. For marketers, that means standing out from the crowd. To accomplish these two things, JCPenney thought it would be a good idea to send out fake drunk tweets.

jcpenney tweet

After thousands of retweets, giggles, and WTFs, the retailer came clean and admitted it was part of a whole #TweetingWithMittens hashtag stunt.

A spokesperson for the shop, Kate Coultas, says, ”We knew Twitter would be very active but wanted to find a way to stay above the Super Bowl fray and instead create our own narrative. Given it was cold, and we are selling Go USA mittens — we thought it could be a fun stunt!”

Read more

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