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Posts Tagged ‘Jimmy Wales’

Study: Wikipedia Errors Damage Brands’ Reputations

Issues. We got 'em.

Most of us rightly see Wikipedia as a flawed but unavoidable source of information; the fact that some of the site’s entries are less than 100% accurate doesn’t make it any less influential.

A recent study conducted by the PRSA, however, determined that errors on companies’ Wikipedia pages can significantly damage their reputations. Some key findings:

  • 59% of those familiar with the pages of their own companies or their companies’ clients indicate that errors exist
  • 28% of respondents believe that these errors could be “reputation-damaging”, while 38% who answered yes to that question believe that such mistakes have already taken their toll on the reputation of the company/client

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Jimmy Wales: ‘Wikipedia Assumes Good Faith’

Left to right: Adweek's Mike Chapman and Jimmy Wales Photo: Nancy Lazarus

Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia and Wikia.com, talked about trust and community in an interview with Adweek editor Mike Chapman during the second day of Adweek’s Social Media Strategies conference in New York on Thursday.

Wales believes that humanizing the communities on the Internet is a solution to increasing the level of trust online. “One of the principles of trust that Wikipedia uses is to assume good faith,” according to Wales. “It turns out that most people are decent and fewer are malicious.”

Wales added,” When people answer their edits, they realize the human dimension, and the community cares if you do a good job.” He contrasted that with newspapers’ online reader comments, where “people are often badly behaved since they are interacting with a giant entity.”

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