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In Which André Leon Talley Fondles Tom Ford’s Waistcoat

Style.com and the rest of the Condé Nast crew elected not to repeat last year’s rather awkward livestreaming of the arrivals at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute gala, but they did keep a camera trained on the indefatigable André Leon Talley on Monday evening as he held court at the top of the carpeted granite stairs shouting terse greetings (“Instagram! Patricia!”) and complimenting ensembles. The result is a series of very, very short videos such as this one, in which Talley and Tom Ford discuss the work of designer Charles James, the subject of this year’s spring Costume Institute exhibition; the textile of Ford’s own sumptous white waistcoat (spoiler alert: silk!); and the sartorial preferences of Ford’s toddler son.

Introducing Archigrams: Famous Buildings for Your Walls

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Having been refused subscriptions to the likes of Wildlife Treasury and Sweet Pickles during our formative years, we’re suckers for flash cards. Combine their didactic delights with posters and architecture and you’ve got Archigrams: minimal, informative prints of famous buildings ranging from Gerrit Rietveld‘s Schroeder House to the Gherkin (a.k.a. 30 St. Mary Axe by Norman Foster, no relation to Sweet Pickles). “The idea came to me years ago when I was an architecture student at UCLA, studying for my architecture history exams,” says Michie Cao, now a graduate student in interaction design at the School of Visual Arts in New York. She returned to the idea as part of a project for her SVA course in Entrepreneurial Design.

“As designers, we tend to be perfectionists and want to hide our ideas from the world until it’s one-hundred-percent developed and perfect. Unfortunately, that often prevents us from actually building it and getting the objective feedback we need to take the next step,” Cao explains. “The goal of this class was therefore to teach us how to use our networks, build a community base, and to learn how to test ideas out in the real world.” Her Archigrams Kickstarter campaign of last month raised $11,258, nearly four times the original goal, and production is now underway. Cao took time to tell us more about the concept, her sentimental favorite building, and how you can get in on the architectural fun.

michie caoHow would you characterize the initial response to your concept?
Mixed! My initial concept of Archigrams was essentially a set of visual flashcards for modern architecture, and the first people I showed this to were classmates, friends, and Reddit. Many people, especially designers and architecture people, told me they loved the prints. Others told me they were turned off by the idea of flashcards, because it invoked bad memories of high school. From there, I iterated and played with all the ways I could frame my concept—first, by completely eliminating the informational aspect of it and then, incrementally bringing it back. Finally, I arrived at the concept I have now, which is that they are beautiful prints, supplemented by tidbits of important information every architect knows. My Kickstarter campaign took a while to catch on in social media, but after getting featured on various blogs and websites and as [a Kickstarter] Project of the Day, it finally got the exposure it needed and took off.
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Advanced Style Goes from Blog to Book to Film

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What began as a blog and became a book—and then a coloring book—has shape-shifted once again. Ari Seth Cohen‘s Advanced Style heads to the big screen via filmmaker Lina Plioplyte, whose documentary follows seven fabulous New Yorkers aged between 62 and 95 as they challenge the stereotypes of beauty and aging with their unique style. Chunky jewelry, statement sunglasses, turbans, magenta, and Iris Apfel all loom large. Advanced Style makes its U.S. debut tomorrow at the Montclair Film Festival in Montclair, New Jersey. The trailer (below) is best enjoyed while wearing a cape and a minimum of eight bangle bracelets.

Sneak Peek: Sagmeister & Walsh’s New Identity for Jewish Museum

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Stefan Sagmeister and Jessica Walsh of Sagmeister & Walsh are following up on “Six Things,” their mesmerizing, happiness-inducing 2013 exhibition at New York’s Jewish Museum, with a new graphic identity for the institution. It debuts tomorrow with a divine dominant blue and a deliberate script typeface that evokes the cadence and squared verticality of the Hebrew alphabet. Designed to evolve with the institution, the new identity system is “inspired by ancient sacred geometry fused with a sleek contemporary aesthetic,” according to the museum. The logo mark, logo typography, patterns, and illustrations were drawn on the same geometric grid from which the Star of David was formed. And stay tuned for the new website, also a Sagmeister & Walsh production. It debuts in June and will feature 3,000 collection objects (over 10% of the collection) with the goal of increasing to at least 20,000 works in the next five years.

Chicago Design Museum to Open Permanent Gallery, Archive

For the past couple of years the Chicago Design Museum has been going about its mission “to unite, inform, and inspire” in pop-up mode. The nomadic institution has exhibited the work of design stars such as Marian Bantjes, Ed Fella, and Debbie Millman, whose 2012 “Look Both Ways” show of large-scale visual essays was part of the Windy City debut (founders Tanner Woodford and Mark Dudlik piloted the concept in Phoenix). Now the museum is looking to settle down, with a permanent space that will serve as both exhibition space and archive. The new HQ debuts this summer, just in time to celebrate the AIGA centennial with an exhibition that will “reintroduce Chicagoans to the last century of design from our city,” according to Woodford, who has big plans for the future. “Beyond this summer, we intend to explore design across other disciplines—architecture, interior, product, furniture, fashion, and more.” A Kickstarter campaign is now underway to make these ambitious plans a reality. Would-be backers have until the evening of Friday, May 2 to show their support.

Design Trust for Public Space Launches New Website

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It’s a daunting project to design a new website for a design-driven, project-based New York City nonprofit: The Design Trust for Public Space (motto: “We love public space.”). Kiss Me I’m Polish and Type/Code were up for the design and development challenges, respectively, and behold the freshly launched Designtrust.org. The new site is intended to be “an effective tool for cities, citizens, and organizations worldwide interested in initiating change in their communities,” according to the Design Trust. In addition to a database of Design Trust initiatives such as Five Borough Farm and Under the Elevated, it includes case studies, a publications library, and an impact map of projects across the five boroughs.

Tomorrow: Join Mediabistro’s Google+ Hangout for Career Advice, Web Design Tips

mediabistro career lunchWe’re excited to announce that Mediabistro is launching a new Google+ Hangout series tomorrow called Career Lunch to help our ever-growing community stay ahead of the job curve. We’ll be talking to a wide variety of media pros, all of whom are from our talented pool of MediabistroEDU instructors. Our first Career Lunch will begin tomorrow at 1 p.m. ET.

Join our MediaJobsDaily editor Vicki Salemi and Mediabistro’s managing editor Valerie Berrios as they talk to Maurice Cherry, creative principal at 3eighteen media, a design and consulting firm.

We’ll find out how you can leverage web design along with social media and digital strategies in order to catapult your career to the next level.

Join the conversation with your questions and comments on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ with the hashtag #mbhangouts.

Put the ‘Fun’ in ‘HTML Fundamentals’

Admit it. Your seven-year-old nephew could out-HTML tag you any day and you think that a Cascading Style Sheet is something with a thread count. That’s where the Mediabistro mothership comes in. They’ve asked us to tell you about the online course in HTML and CSS that kicks off next week. Over four fun-filled sessions, web designer (and illustrator) Laura Galbraith will guide you through a variety of web page production techniques, from column-based layouts and search engine optimization to semantic markup and advanced CSS styles. And you’re bound to ace the typography sections. The online learning fun begins April 1 (make of that what you will). Preview the course syllabus and register here.

Quote of Note | Kickstarter’s Yancey Strickler

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“From the very beginning we decided—my co-founders and I—that we would never sell, never go public. We viewed Kickstarter as a public trust. This is a place of opportunity for anyone to make their thing happen, and it’s our job to be the stewards of it and to honor it. We were looking at growing this into a living, breathing cultural institution that’s there to represent the interests of everybody. And we think the best way to do that is to be a privately held, independently controlled organization—and that’s exactly what we are.”

-Kickstarter co-founder and CEO Yancey Strickler in an interview with Charlie Rose for Bloomberg Businessweek.

Collins Creates New Identity for Internet Week

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internet week nyHere at UnBeige HQ, every week is Internet week (if the wi-fi goes down for even a few minutes, we become testy and commence the hoarding of foodstuffs), but capitalize that “W” and you’re talking about a “festival of technology, business, and culture” that has been taking place in New York since 2008 and in London since 2010. Each Internet Week consists of hundreds of events that draw thousands of people, and yet the festival’s logos have long been, well, less than cutting-edge—sufficed to say that at one point there was a pixellated apple involved. Then they got Collins on the case.

A team that included Brian Collins, Dave Frankel, and Ali Ring looked beyond familiar tech tropes—the slash, the dot, the leaning arrow—and onward to the bracket. A three-dimensional pair is at the core of their flexible new identity for Internet Week. Not only can the brackets open to accommodate copy, photography, and illustrations but their angles play nice with the letterforms involved, all of which can be layered at various weights to simulate a blinking cursor. Keep an eye out for banners real and virtual that herald the next installment of the festival, which gets underway on May 19 in New York.

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