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Media Jobs Monthly Newsletter

July 14, 2010
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Rather than cry plagiarism, I actually find it gratifying to see a news item published that includes something we've been saying for years: The "unemployment" rate of 9.5 percent isn't really meaningful until you segment the population according to who has a four-year degree and who doesn't.

But what really matters to you and me, as potential job seekers and recruiters, is whether the available jobs are well-matched with the available job seekers. Therein lies the rub, so to speak. We all know perfectly intelligent, well-educated people who simply cannot find jobs because their experience doesn't fit with employers' needs. That's why finding a better way to match job seekers to open positions is a hot pursuit for service providers like mediabistro.com (check out our Scoop Jobs offering), Monster.com, and even The Ladders.

These new services are more of a natural progression for job boards, as opposed to a last gasp in an ever more social world. Mark what we have to say here because you will be reading it in the future: Social media is absolutely part of the recruitment process, and it is here to stay. The good, bad and ugly. So employers are spending lots on website upgrades even when they don't have jobs to fill, encouraging their employees to use their social networks for recruitment , and checking up on candidates via the Web.

Yet, what this all really means is that recruiters are more overwhelmed and over-worked than ever. So, you guessed it: They are turning back to job boards and their new matching services to pull a few qualified candidates into the pipeline early and shorten the recruitment process. Ultimately, it appears that social media has made recruitment more labor-intensive, not less. Job seekers certainly know it has made the job search more of a labor.

This is why the perspectives on candidates from key hiring managers like Janet Balis, EVP of media sales and marketing for Martha Stewart Living, are so valuable -- so much so that even we here at Mediabistro make you pay for them. But, lucky for you, the preview is free! It is also why candidates will never stop amazing us with their ingenuity. It brings new meaning to reading between the lines.

Bill Conneely,
Director, Strategy

P.S. If you want more great insight to the job market, join us at Mediabistro's Career Circus on August 4th in NYC.


Private Employment Inches Up As Census Jettisons Temps (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
The U.S. shed 125,000 jobs in June, thanks to the Census letting go 225,000 temporary census workers. Private hiring, however, was up 83,000 -- modest, but more than what analysts had predicted. Payroll giant ADP, for example, had estimated that only 13,000 private-sector jobs had been added in June.

Is Unemployment Really that Bad? (Arbita Consulting and Education Services)
One recruiter argues that that big scary 9.5 percent unemployment rate is not as bad as it sounds. Why? Because if you're recruiting, the unemployment rate that really matters is the one measuring just professional, college-educated workers. And that rate is much less scary than the national one. Maybe that's why the war for talent never went away.

Disappearing Job Boards (RecruitingBlogs.com)
Is this the year that job boards go extinct? They certainly seem to have peaked, with more job boards closing than opening, according to Jill Czeczuga of JobBoardReviews.com. Social networking, meanwhile, is up, with 92 percent of hiring companies using some sort of social media in their recruiting efforts.

6Sense Matching Launched for Applicant Ranking (ERE.net)
Monster.com's semantic search technology is now available for recruiters to use. It'll rank applicants using its patented secret formula in a more "intelligent" way than old search would, even to the point of following an applicant's career progression. When the robots take over the world, don't say we didn't warn you.

The Ladders Begins Offering Sourcing Service (ERE.net)
Controversial job board The Ladders is now offering a sourcing service, where it promises to deliver five to 10 "best-fit" candidates for a job within 48 hours. Only $100k candidates here, we swear.

Is It Legal To Use Social Network Data When Hiring? (Inc.)
Yes, but be careful. One of the best tips is to separate the online vetting from the person doing the hiring, so a third party can screen out inappropriate information.

Employee Referral Programs Using More Social Media (ERE.net)
Social recruiting isn't just for cultivating new talent. Many companies are using social tools to boost their referral programs, which sounds like a double-whammy of recruiting awesomeness. Check out what Enterprise is trying.

Corporate Career Websites Get Upgrades (WSJ.com)
If your recruiting website doesn't have Youtube integration, blogs from employees, and Twitter updates, you may be falling behind. The latest career pages from top employers -- even those that aren't hiring much right now -- are packed with Web 2.0 bells and whistles to attract a new generation.

This Actually Happens: White-Fonting (MediaJobsDaily)
Those wascally candidates! What won't they think of next? The latest trick is something called "white-fonting," when job applicants hide invisible keywords in the margins of their resume in order to trick an ATS into spitting them out first. Who'da thunk someone would try this?

What Is Janet Balis, EVP of Media Sales & Marketing for MSLO, Looking For In A Candidate? (mediabistro.com)
As EVP of media sales and marketing for Martha Stewart Living, Janet Balis knows how to hire marketing people. Take a page from her book with this On Demand video from mediabistro.com.


--Compiled by Rachel Kaufman, editor, MediaJobsDaily.com



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