TVNewser Jobs PRNewser Jobs AgencySpy Jobs SocialTimes Jobs

Freelance

Six Business Lessons for Freelancers

LifeAsFreelancerWhen we read this piece on Forbes, we nodded in agreement.

After all, why should freelancers learn these lessons the hard way when they points have been outlined for us? ShortStack asked their Facebook fans, “What is one business lesson you learned the hard way?”

And away we go…here are their answers, as per ShortStack’s CEO Jim Belosic.

1. You can’t do it all on your own. If you’re setting up shop as a freelancer and creating your own site, social media accounts, the works, chances are you’ll get burned out. Fast. Belosic points out, “Building a team is essential because there are only so many hours one person can devote to a business.”

2. Do one thing incredibly well. As a freelancer, you’re an entrepreneur wearing many hats. If you’re a generalist, will that hurt your chances as a writer compared to say, specializing in financial markets? The piece suggests specializing and then providing a skill or service that makes your core even better. Read more

Three Steps to Make a Killing as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerWe all know that being a freelance writer is an unpredictable career, filled with many monetary ups and downs. Although writing isn’t typically considered a six-figure career, it most definitely can be.

Our latest Mediabistro feature highlights three steps freelancers should take in order to earn a major paycheck this year. The first (and some would argue, most important) step: plan in advance.

The key to an effective income earning strategy, says Kelly James-Enger, a 17-year veteran freelancer, is to focus efforts on what you can control and to stop stressing about what you can’t. “You can’t control how many assignments you get, but you can control how many pitches you’ll send out each week,” she said. “Even if you haven’t seen those [pitches] turn into [an assignment], you know that you’ve met [your] goals. And there’s plenty of research that shows that meeting goals makes you more confident and spurs you on to meet more goals.”

For more tips, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Networking Is Key to Being a Successful Freelance Travel Writer

Travel WritingTravel writing as a genre stirs up plenty of emotion in people. Let’s be honest, it’s mostly jealousy. Getting paid to travel the world sounds like a pretty sweet deal, and it is… and isn’t. The reality of life as a freelance travel writer isn’t as glamorous as it’s made out to be. You’re constantly hustling to find work and it can be stressful at times.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, a freelance travel writer discusses the ups and downs of following her passion. One thing’s for sure: networking helped her land work:

Networking continues to be key, as with any profession. I’ve found that travel writers and bloggers are a strong community, and many of us introduce our colleagues to editors we work with if the fit is right. I’ve had the opportunity to write for a large daily newspaper, thanks in large part to a fellow writer I met on a press trip. And don’t forget to use social media for connections. I recently e-introduced myself to a new editor and her publication I’d read about on Twitter and made a few pitches I thought would be a fit — we’re now in conversation about assignments. It’s all about making the right pitch!

To hear more tips on how to cultivate your travel writing career, read: Embarking on My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

A Freelance Web Designer Turned CEO Explains His Road To Success

GabrielShaoolianGabriel Shaoolian‘s success story is at once familiar and entirely unique. He moved to NYC in 2001 and set up his business with nothing but a laptop and some web design experience. Since then, his company, Blue Fountain Media, has generated over $2 billion in revenue by building sites for everyone from AT&T to AOL.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s Hey, How’d You Do That?, Shaoolian talks about how he went from a freelance web designer to CEO:

Describe the early days of your freelance life.
Well, let me tell you, and I’ll tell anyone out there. It’s crazy. You know, doing this without funding, you lose a lot of sleep, and you lose your life, really. The company becomes your life. It’s not easy. It’s not for someone who wants weekends and who wants vacations. I tell people that you go on vacation and you are still thinking about work every second of every day.

I had no idea what I was in for. I just wanted to build something small. But I realized that I can’t do everything on my own. If I want to do good work, I need team members that are specialized. As Blue Fountain Media grew, I started working on an infrastructure for the company.

To hear more about Shaoolian’s career, as well as his advice for freelancers and entrepreneurs, read: Hey, How’d You Build Profitable Websites For Brands Like AOL and AT&T, Gabriel Shaoolian?

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How Adopting A Uniform Could Help Your Freelance Career

MinimalismFreelancers who work from home understand the need to minimize better than most. When you’re constantly surrounded by your own junk, the endless distractions can become paralyzing and your work may suffer as a result.

So how can freelancers create a minimalist lifestyle? One of the easiest things to do is to adopt a daily uniform. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one freelancer shares her story about how simplifying her life helped her writing:

I love a comfortable, practical pajama as much as the next freelancer, but I’ve found that having a set uniform has two powerful results: First, I don’t waste any time deciding what to wear. I grab one of two black shirts, and one of my two pairs of pants. I don’t have to rifle through hanger after hanger in my closet, because I’ve whittled down my wardrobe to about 20 items — shoes included, gender stereotypes be damned. And because I wear my uniform during work hours, I get the satisfaction of changing into my beloved sweatpants at the end of the day. The other result of my simplified wardrobe is that I take myself seriously. If those in offices are told to dress for the job they’re striving to have, where does that leave freelancers?

For more on how this writer simplified mind and matter, read: The Minimalist Freelance Life.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Hey Managers, Want to Spike Productivity? Here’s a Hint: Give Team a Raise

moneyWant to put a little spring in your step while boosting the wallet of someone on your team? If you’re a manager, you may see the benefits of giving an unexpected salary increase.

As per Fortune, the average salary increase has been approximately three percent each year. How can the typical worker stay motivated to work hard when compensation isn’t exactly linked to performance?

Well, according to a study conducted by Harvard Business School, there’s a quick and effective way to boost productivity and morale. After you hire new employees, spike their pay! Read more

Three Ways to Tackle Freelance Isolation

LifeAsFreelancerWe’ve been so focused lately on office dynamics that we don’t want to overlook our freelance friends. Yes, entrepreneurs — we’re talking to you.

Inspired by this piece on Freelancers Union, there are a few ways to fend off the isolation blues. Sure, we know how liberating it is to make our own schedules and have the ability to work from anywhere but there are ways to overcome the drawbacks of feeling lonely and oh-so-isolate.

1. Create structure. When your day has a purpose from the minute you wake up and it’s full of meetings, phone calls and a work schedule on a calendar similar to how you would schedule a meeting, it’s easier to squash loneliness. Even if you schedule specific times during the day (perhaps when you’re least productive) to run to the dry cleaners or grab a bite to eat for lunch, you’ll stay occupied. Plus, it’s important to get fresh air so be sure to schedule that as well. Read more

How To Hone Your Specialty As A Freelance Writer

specializingHaving a specialty as writer is a huge advantage in the cutthroat world of freelancing. It can help distinguish you from you peers and create new work opportunities for you to showcase your skills.

Establishing your expertise is key to developing your reputation. It’s also important to make sure the community is aware of your work. Veteran freelancers agree that in order to do that, networking with other writers is key:

Getting your name and face out into the world can be intimidating, but you don’t have to reinvent the wheel to do it. Start by having your byline out there, Rae Francoeur operater of the New Arts Collaborative suggests. Also, consider writer’s conferences, book expos and blog conventions. Camilla McLaughlin, a real estate writer, connects with local editors and homeowners and attends trade shows to keep her finger on the pulse of real estate.

To hear more tips on how to enhance your writing career, including when you should decline a gig, read: Growing Your Writing Career By Becoming A Specialist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Three Ways to Cope With Rejection

rejectionNo.

It’s not a pretty word, let’s face it. Especially when it’s bestowed upon you. As in, “No, we don’t like your work.” Or, “No, that’s not a good idea.” Or simply the silent treatment which we pretty much take for a no anyway.

Per a piece on The Intern Queen, there are a few ways to shrug it off and not let it affect your day. Lauren Berger writes, “Rejection is the biggest fear that young people have about the workplace. And it make sense – in the media, we don’t usually read about people’s failures – we read about their successes.”

She adds, “But I promise, with every success comes a rejection. If I hadn’t been rejected countless times – I wouldn’t be running the business that I am today.”

Here are a few ways to handle the inevitable not-so-fuzzy-feeling… Read more

Website Calls Out Media Outlets Owing Journalists Money

moneyPay me, please!

Seriously. That’s the actual name of a Web site devoted to calling out media outlets owing journalists their coveted cash, per a shout out on Jim Romenesko.

Freelancer Iona Craig had enough of clients with outstanding invoices so she joined forces with Beacon to specifically create a site to bring attention to the matter. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>