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Four Myth Busters About Temporary Work

ImproveJobProspectsIf you think a temp job looks shady on your resume, listen up. Opportunities are thriving in this area and hiring managers aren’t really thinking your resume is tarnished if temporary assignments are part of your portfolio. If you focus on the job itself and not the duration, you should be good to go.

Plus, the numbers tell all: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, temporary services have added more than 100,000 jobs from January 1 until now and has added more than 200,000 jobs over the course of an entire year.

Companies are looking to staffing firms for temporary needs and they’re seeing the value of temporary workers. And as a temporary worker if you’re currently on the bench for full-time work, at least your skills are remaining sharp and you’re making new connections. Read more

Mediabistro Course Social Media 101

Get hands-on social media training for beginners in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Hurry, this boot camp starts next week! Register now!

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Play Ball! Sports Industry Employment’s On the Rise

sportsIf you’re hitting a brick wall in looking for media, advertising and creative opportunities, you may want to look into sports-related jobs.

That’s because sports employment overall is on the rise. It’s hot-hot-hot according to a new survey released by CareerBuilder. Read more

Four Ways to Stand Out From Other Job Seekers

handshake2This just in…according to data from The Creative Group, advertising and marketing executives receive an average of 23 resumes for every position they need to fill. As for interviewing itself, they meet six job seekers before extending an offer.

We’re actually surprised the number of resumes isn’t a lot higher! Whether it’s 223 or 23, there are several ways to stand out from the pack during your job search. Read more

Tablet Etiquette for Job Interviews

FI One mand BandAnswering your cell phone during an interview isn’t only rude, it’s wrong. So is leaving your cell phone on a nearby desk or table in full view.

As for a tablet? Well, that’s a slightly different story. Keep in mind the purpose of the interview is for the hiring manager to get to know you. You shouldn’t be buried in your device but, according to Ask Annie, a tablet can help make you “a stronger and more memorable candidate.”

Here’s an example: If you’re a web designer, you can literally show the interviewer a variety of sites you’ve created. Instead of describing them, simply show off your work.

Show, don’t tell. Read more

What Not to Do When You’re Running Late to an Interview

suitYou know how things snowball, right? You’re running late to an interview and then you spill your coffee. As you wipe it off your suit, the napkin disintegrates and makes white, visible balls of cotton on your lap. Lovely.

Well, here’s the thing. Running late is inevitable. It’s going to happen at one point or another.

As soon as you realize you’re going to be late, contact the recruiter via phone, email or text to let him or her know you’re running behind. Here in New York City, the E train is notoriously slow so it’s not uncommon for a job seeker to be late 30 minutes or more thanks to mass transit — been there, done that, seen it happen. Read more

Three Ways to Ace the Panel Interview

videoWhile we talk a lot about job interviews, one type of interview which is often dreaded is the good ol’ panel interview. Yes, we’re talking about being interviewed by five people at the same time because after all, there’s nothing like a pressure cooker!

Kidding.

You can ace this. You will ace this. We know you will but it doesn’t hurt to have a little ammo at the ready to truly rock it. Read more

Four Items to Remove From Long Resumes

ImproveJobProspectsIf your resume is approaching three pages, do not pass go, do not collect $200. Resumes, as you probably already know, should be one page or two pages at best. Going on three pages? That’s more like a dissertation.

Now, that’s not to disqualify your hard work, skills and experiences, we just wouldn’t want you to get passed over because it’s too lengthy. There are ways to sharpen and tighten it up and that includes removing four loquacious items, as per a piece we saw on U.S. News & World Report. Read more

Four Clues to an Unprofessional Résumé

unhappy-computer-keyYour résumé is essentially putting your best foot forward. So why have it riddled with mistakes? When we worked in recruiting that was the biggest red flag ever. Mistakes weren’t only indicators of a poor candidate, there were other issues, too.

TheLadders recently pointed out these snafus in one of their posts so we simply have to share:

1. Random or cute email accounts. Please don’t have an account that reads something like this: “cupcakes2014@domain.com.” Puh-leeze. There’s no reason why you shouldn’t have a professional sounding account or at least one that’s you’re own. Please avoid including joint accounts on your résumé even if it’s what you currently use 24/7. Examples include thesimpsons@domain.com or janeandsteve@domain.com. Read more

How to Follow Up Post-Interview Without Being a Pest

Job-SearchWe know the drill. You’re on an interview feeling pretty darn proud of your performance and at the end, the vague question comes up: “When can I expect to hear back?”

Crickets.

The recruiter may not know. The hiring manager may not know. No matter what, you’ll probably get a vague response like, “We’re still evaluating candidates and you should hear from us soon.”

Ah, soon. What is that, really? Two days? Two weeks? Well, never fear. We’ve been on the other side (and by that, we mean the recruiting trenches) and there are a few things to keep in mind. Read more

How to Ace Behavioral & Situational Interviews

interviewThere are a few different types of interview questions, and here at MJD, our mission is to help prepare you to ace either one!

Let’s dig right in, shall we? There’s the behavioral one which is always a favorite. It dives deeper. While many interviewers prefer to stay on the surface by asking direct questions about your past work experiences, some may venture into the land of behavioral questions.

These types of inquiries focus on your past to predict future outcomes. For instance, they may ask you to describe a time when you were embroiled in internal politics on the job. What was the outcome? Tell me about your biggest setback and how you overcame it. Read more

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