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Journalism Advice

Three Career Tips From TV Personality Lauren Lake

gavelIf you’ve seen Lauren Lake’s Paternity Court, then you’ve seen Lake presiding overly highly emotional cases.

Well, when it comes to career advice, she’s equally as passionate. We recently caught up with Lake for an exclusive interview.

1. Stop yearning for Fridays. “Get away from a place where you’re living for Friday and dreading Monday,” she advises. “Find what you love most in life and create a life around that. It’s possible.”

For instance, Lake loves to be artistic and also loves intellectual things like practicing law and helping people. “I found a way to combine all of those things…we can each do this in our own lives. It just takes doing the work.” Read more

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Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on Janaury 27  at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Whip Your Website Into Shape to Improve Your Pitch Acceptance Rates

Professional-website-articleIf you’re a freelance writer, you probably link to your personal website in your email signature and social media profile pages. Your site may be a blog on a hosted domain, a page you haven’t updated in months, or it may be a well-executed window to who you are as a writer.

When sending out  pitches, your website can be a make-or-break factor for editors deciding whether to give your story the go-ahead. Establish your trustworthiness and showcase your best work with a professional, well-designed site.

[Carol Tice, freelance writer and founder of several web resources for writers] highlights four main components of a killer website: a homepage, an “About” page, contact info, clips and testimonials. The homepage should clearly and concisely state what you do and how you can help your client, while your About page can delve into the work you’ve done recently. “A lot of people’s About pages start, ‘I first knew I wanted to be a writer when I was five years old.’” Tice says. “This is not what the client wants to know about you — they want to know, ‘Who have you been writing for lately?’”

For more tips, read: How to Create a Writer’s Website That Gets You Work.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Dyllan McGee Explains: ‘Explosion of Platform is an Explosion of Opportunity’

Photo credit: Jan Goldstoff

We recently caught up with Emmy Award-winning producer Dyllan McGee at the WiCi Awards sponsored by New York Women in Communications (NYWICI).

The event honored rising stars in media and as McGee emceed, we couldn’t help but get a dose of inspiration from the filmmaker herself.

She created and founded MAKERS, a digital and video storytelling platform that aims to be the largest and most dynamic collection of women’s stories ever assembled. It launched online in 2012 and premiered on-air in 2013 on PBS.

MediaJobsDaily: What were your thoughts when you started out doing a documentary about women only to find out it had never been done before? Read more

Megyn Kelly’s Career Advice: ‘When the Opportunity Comes Along to Grow, Seize It’

Need a boost on hump day? Look no further.

We caught up with media power players on Monday night at the annual Broadcasting & Cable Hall of Fame Awards. Bob Costas and Megyn Kelly hosted the black tie event at the Waldorf Astoria.

ABC news anchor Robin Roberts, NBC Sports chairman Mark Lazarus, CBS chief research officer David Poltrack and Televisa CEO Emilio Azcárraga were among the new inductees.

Let’s hear what Costas, Kelly, Deborah Norville, Joe Torre and Matt WeinerMad Men creator, say about success. WATCH:

Joe Cross Shares Content Tips: ‘If Your Content is Good, It Will Get Seen’

Photo courtesy of fatsickandnearlydead2.com

Photo courtesy of fatsickandnearlydead2.com

Here’s the thing. So many of us are toiling away at day jobs with the dream of writing the great American novel at night. Or maybe you’re hoping to get more followers on your YouTube channel so you can stop juggling four freelance jobs and focus on just one or two.

Or maybe it’s a straightforward scenario: you don’t have a side job but you’re incredibly focused on your day job and getting content out there.

Whatever the case, one thing’s in common for sure: We’re all pretty darn passionate about the content we’re creating. That’s why Joe Cross says, “If your content is good, it will get seen.” Read more

TV Executive Dishes When to Resign: ‘Am I Learning?’

successThe following interview in The Wall Street Journal really struck a chord. Courteney Monroe, chief executive of National Geographic Channels, previously worked in marketing at HBO for 13 years.

When is the right time to leave a job? If you’re not learning, if you’re not challenged, if you’re not still making a difference — all answers point to moving on. Mentioning it’s an easy to stay somewhere too long, Monroe highlighted that you have to actively manage your career to avoid settling into that rut. Read more

Remembering Joan Rivers & What She Told Us Last Year About Staying Relevant

This morning we’re remembering the incredible life and work of Joan Rivers. As media folks and celebrities recall their interactions with the 81-year-old comedian, we’re joining the pack.

Last year she emceed New York Women in Communications’ annual Matrix Awards along with daughter Melissa. She was certainly in major demand on the red carpet prior to the luncheon.

Thankfully we snagged a quick interview with the star and learned a lot from this woman who has reinvented herself to stay relevant in the public eye for decades.

May she rest in peace.

Check Out Our G+ Lunch Hangout Tomorrow!

mb logoWhat’s on your calendar tomorrow during lunchtime? Do we really need to ask?

We’re hoping you’ll join us on Google+ for the next career lunch hangout at 1 p.m. EDT.

Join your MediaJobsDaily editor Vicki Salemi and Mediabistro managing editor Valerie Berrios as they talk to Kim Taylor, a freelance copywriter for a variety of agencies and brands including David Levy, Brand Jam and American Express Platinum Travel.

Get tips on how freelancers can manage their time, land new clients and even pursue a passion project on the side.

Oh, did we mention that it’s free? Looking forward to having you join us!

Basic HTML Can Be a Valuable Skill on a Media Intern’s Resume

Media-Intern-Post-4Compared to other millennials, I am late to the technology game. I didn’t have my first home computer until halfway through my freshman year of high school — in 2007. I still remember having to go to my dad’s office or a library to type up papers, which I didn’t even bother with until one English teacher complained about a handwritten short story I submitted. Mind you, my penmanship was impeccable (it’s since taken a turn for the worse).

Now that I’ve caught up and spend most waking hours in front of a screen, I cannot stress enough how important it is for media interns to be more than computer literate and fluent in Microsoft Word. They need to learn some coding.

I’ve said before that journalists should not be one-man bands, but this doesn’t mean they cannot know the basics of the technologies and tools they use today. And coding is a big one.

My experience with HTML before this past year was nonexistent. Aside from the one or two tips I’d glean from a friend who majored in computer science, I basically discarded the skill as something unnecessary for journalism. After all, I’d want to write, not produce. My time should be spent working on finding stories and polishing my writing. Read more

How to Temper the Fear of Dreaded Pitch Meetings

Pitch-Meetings-Bog-PostFor the first few weeks that I attended pitch meetings at Guideposts magazine, I was a nervous wreck. Every time 10 o’clock on Wednesday morning rolled around, I’d anxiously fidget and crumple the pitch sheet I’d prepared with palms that were already starting to sweat. I preferred to sit in the chair farthest from the table and look down at my now-damp paper, so I wouldn’t be called on. Part of the reason I got so nervous is because of my own introverted self, but the main reason is because as an intern you have an overwhelmingly strong desire to please your editor and any dissatisfaction makes you question yourself and your abilities. Now that I’ve had a few weeks of pitch meetings under my belt, I feel I can share what I’ve learned about making these meetings a little less terrifying for interns. Read more

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