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Seven Ways to Spice Up Your LinkedIn Profile

linkedinIf you’re on LinkedIn regularly just like we are, chances are your profile may be a bit stagnant from time to time.

Looking to spice it up? Look no further. Courtesy of LinkedIn, here are a few quick tips they sent us to hopefully boost your views and connections on a daily basis.

1. Create a catchy headline! How about something like, “Social Media Manager?” People should be able to detect exactly what you do by simply reading it.

2. Add your industry to your profile. This will appear at the top headline under your title so it’s clear for people to also identify your industry. Read more

Mediabistro Course Freelancing 101

Manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Starting August 18, freelancing experts will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your own schedule and managing clients.  Register now!

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Three Tips to Research a Future Employer Prior to That Interview

suitWe know the deal. You’re pressed for time with that upcoming job interview. So pressed, in fact, that you barely have time to get your suit dry cleaned and ready to go but aside from rocking out to your appearance, there’s one area you simply shouldn’t overlook: Research.

If you don’t come prepared, it could be game over before it already began. For starters, what media company would want to hire someone who didn’t do their homework? This is your shot to do some digging, really snoop around in the spirit of not only landing the job but seeing any potential red flags sooner rather than later. Read more

In the Position to Hire? Three Ways to Botch the Interview Process

resume mistakesIf you have the power to extend an offer or two, there are a few ways you may be self-sabotaging the process without even knowing it.

According to a post on ERE by Marc Debinski, author of The Hiring Compass, there are a few aspects to keep in mind so you don’t fall into the trap of hiring the wrong candidate.

1. Self-mirroring mirage. What is this, you ask? Well, it refers to someone influential in the hiring process who sees a lot of themselves in the candidate. He points out, “A high ego rationalizes, ‘I’m good in my job; I’m good for this business. Naturally, the best thing I can do for this business is hire people just like me.’” Read more

Survey Shows How Social Media Packs a Punch in Hiring

new_twitter_logoIf you’re scanning your Twitter and Facebook profiles right now to see if anything is potentially harmful, you’re making the right move.

That’s because a new survey conducted by CareerBuilder discovered 51 percent of employers who have researched job candidates actually found content that caused them to not hire the candidate. This is up from last year’s findings of 43 percent and from 2012′s results of 34 percent. Read more

For New Site Hironomy, Think LinkedIn Meets eHarmony

rosesNew site alert! This one piqued our interest. LinkedIn, eHarmony and a recruiter walk into a bar…

Okay, we’re getting punchy again here in MediaJobsDaily land! The co-founder of new recruiting site Hironomy envisions his company as LinkedIn and eHarmony. Here’s why: The site aims match candidates based on their cultural fit, behavioral aptitudes and cognitive aptitudes.

The site looks at candidates to see whether they match a job, a team and an organization. The ultimate scenario, “the Hironomous fit” occurs when “job seekers are presented with opportunities to work for a company that shares their values, values their talent & ambitions and offers them with opportunities to grow professionally.” Read more

‘Hey, How Soon Can I Take a Vacation?’ & Other Questions to Avoid Asking During an Interview

interviewHave you ever asked an interviewer at the conclusion of the interview for feedback as in, “Hey man, how’d I do?”

Probably not, right? And if you did ask the question, how’d that work out for you?

Okay, we’re in a punchy mood right now but so important as it is to ask questions at the end of each job interview, it’s just as important to steer clear from any questions that are downright inappropriate. They lack tact.

And most of all, some of the questions can be transparent in terms of your priorities as in asking if you resign if you can get paid out for your unused personal time (yes, it has been done and no, that candidate did not get the offer.) Read more

Need More Proof to Network? Zappos Received 31,000 Applicants & Hired 1.5 Percent

resume mistakesWe read this post on ERE and had an a-ha moment to share with you. Having been on the other side of the desk working directly with candidates, we know the feeling of seeing hundreds upon hundreds of resumes stacked up in the applicant tracking system.

But here’s proof that we just have to share. Mike Bailen, head of talent and senior HR manager at the Zappos Family of Companies indicated Zappos received more than 31,000 applicants last year. Read more

Got Typos? New Survey Says It Could Be Game Over When They’re on Your Resume

typosIf you have one or two typos on your resume that state something like you’re “graduating this Maybe,” listen up.

Per a new Accountemps survey, that’s enough of a reason to be dismissed from the hiring process. That is, 63 percent of senior managers in the survey indicated they would say buh-bye to candidates with typos in their CVs.

As for the good news? The survey shows employers are more lenient than they’ve been in the past. In 2009, 40 percent of survey participants indicated one minor snag on a resume would put it in the slush pile but now that number has decreased to 17 percent. Read more

New Survey Says 89 Percent of Job Seekers Rely on Mobile Devices

mobile phonesIt’s hard to believe there once was a time when many of us actually searched for a job offline. As in the newspaper!

That’s because a new survey published by Glassdoor reveals 89 percent of job seekers rely on their mobile device to search for a new gig. That’s really no surprise when you think about how convenient it is to search whether you’re sitting on a train for your commute or in the waiting room at a doctor’s office. Whatever the scenario, the numbers keep rising. Read more

Nashville Company Incorporates Ping-Pong into Job Interviews

ping pongYes, you read that right! The Nashville-based company, TechnologyAdvice, incorporates a friendly game of ping-pong into their hiring process.

And per a piece on Inc., it sounds like it’s not such a bad idea after all. Per their CEO, Rob Bellenfant, this hiring technique has been incorporated to the final step of the job interview.

After all of the interviews have been finished, a company executive asks each candidate if they are willing to play a game of table tennis because the company is participating in a study. Prior to playing, the candidate completes a questionnaire addressing questions like rating their aggressiveness.

Next, the candidate plays three 11-point games against the company’s data strategy director. As each game proceeds, the director ups his own game and makes it more and more challenging for the job candidate.

Are they looking to assess how well they play? Not exactly.

Bellenfant explains in the piece,

“We’re not looking at people’s ability to play but at their approach. Are they open to trying something new if they haven’t played before, or not in a long time? If they win, how do they celebrate? If they lose, do they take it in a difficult way? How seriously do they take it? Do they take it as a joke, or do they put in a lot of effort? As the games get more difficult, do they adapt? Those are the types of things we’re looking at.”

Interestingly enough, games are recorded on video and then the CEO evaluates each one, along with a statistician and psychologist from Vanderbilt, along with the president of the Nashville Table Tennis Club in an effort to make it “as objective as possible.”

After the three games have been finished, candidates complete yet another questionnaire asking them to rate the experience. Bellenfant says this set of questions could reveal self-introspection. If a candidate rates him or herself a seven prior to playing and then after gives a self-rating of three, perhaps they learned from something. And maybe they originally rated him or herself as a three and then a seven — that shows harsh self-judgment.

He adds, “For a position in sales, we’re looking for someone a little more aggressive. For a job in data or research, we want someone who can think things through.”

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