You and your recruiter are not besties, as much as you wish you were.

According to Google recruiter Michael Junge, that’s one of the biggest mistakes job applicants make.

“A lot of people see us as a necessary evil; others see us as a powerful ally. It’s interesting how that plays out in people’s attitudes and behaviors and the way they interact with us,” he tells PEHub. “The reality is that we’re trying to make sure we’re hiring the best people, including people who have the best attitude as well as skill set. Any time someone tells me, ‘I would never say this to a hiring manager, but…’ whatever comes after the ‘but’ does not advance their cause.”

Other problems: being late for phone calls or people “who get wrapped up in little details” make poor hires, Junge says. “You can also learn a lot, usually later in the process, by how someone handles the negotiation around their salary. I’ve seen people become very emotional when we start talking about money. I’ve also seen them make commitments and then back out. One specific red flag is not being willing to share salary history, or misrepresenting salary history…if a candidate blatantly exaggerates his pay, if someone making $80,000 says they are making $110,000 in order to get a better offer, that can be [a conversation ender].”