videoWelcome to the video interview! No, we’re not talking about Skype. Instead, we’re talking about a one-way video in which candidates answer employer questions with short video answers.

According to a post on recruiting forum ERE, there are a few key questions most employers will ask. And they’re not always looking for the answer itself. They’re often looking to see if you’ll be a cultural fit. Whether it’s in real time or prerecorded, there are a few ways to be prepared. For starters, it helps to anticipate what you’ll be asked.

Here are some of the questions…

  • Describe yourself in three words.
  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • Tell me about a time you made a mistake. How did you address it and what did you learn?
  • What’s your favorite aspect of your current position?
  • Tell me about a time you worked as part of a team.
  • What do you like best about the company?

These particular questions, writes Josh Tolan, can provide recruiters with insight into how candidates work best. Plus, the job seeker will shed light on how they see themselves as well as the company.

Answers should lend themselves well to the job you’re pursuing. So, if you’re a manager you should state the value of teamwork in your answers. If you mention you don’t like working as part of a team, it could be game over considering most managerial jobs entail interacting with others.

Depending on the company culture for the job you’re pursuing, the answers will provide fodder for recruiters to narrow down the list to proceed to the next round of interviews. During the interview, recruiters will also look for non-verbal cues.

If you’re pursuing a job that’s client facing and yet you barely smile during the interview, that’s not exactly reassuring to the recruiter. If it’s a startup requiring long hours and an entrepreneurial spirit, you should refrain from wincing when the hours beyond 9 to 5 are mentioned.

Be yourself without being self-conscious but remember your body language during video interviews can reveal more than what you actually say.