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Lookin’ Good! Labor Department Releases Strong Jobs Data

job oppsAs we head into the holiday weekend, there’s good new to report as per the Department of Labor.

In June, employers added 288,000 jobs and the unemployment rate dropped to 6.1 percent. Can we get a woo-hoo? In addition, the number of jobs created in May was boosted to 224,000 from the original number of 217,000.

Let’s keep in mind 2014 got off to a very slow start thanks to an abysmal winter — in turn, frigid temps and horrid conditions ultimately froze hiring. According to a CBS piece, the new jobs should expedite economic growth. The math is simple: More jobs lead to more money lead to more products and services being purchased. Read more

Three Reasons to Avoid Scheduling That Early Morning Meeting

bosstoclientIf you’re in the position to run a weekly meeting (or any meeting), raise your hand! Now, keep it raised if you think the best time to hold it is 8 or 9 a.m. Well, according to a Fast Company piece, you may want to think again.

1. Different times of the day have different opportunity costs. Per a white paper, energy levels during the day peak at 8 a.m. Yes, you read that right! Go time. By late afternoon, people start dragging. So, if you have a meeting at 8 a.m., you’re erasing the opportunity for productivity. Read more

And the Number One City for Job Satisfaction Is…

employee satisfactionSan Jose!

Glassdoor released their second annual employment satisfaction report card by comparing cities of overall employee satisfaction, number of employers hiring, business outlook expectations and more.

Results are based on local employee feedback from the past year and as per results, the Bay Area has taken the honors. San Francisco has taken the second spot. In fact, both areas are the homes for a few companies that won the Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Awards, too. Read more

Editors Discuss How Interns Can Make a Lasting Impression

As we all know, every career — media based or otherwise — begins at the bottom of the rung. But while you toil away at data entry work, research or transcribing interviews, it’s important to remember that your time spent as an intern could be your launching pad — so it’s imperative to make a lasting impression.

One of the first things interns should understand is what their priorities are. It’s great if a media job allows its interns to regularly pitch content and story ideas, but those opportunities should be secondary. Taylor Trudon, editor of Huffington Post Teen had this to say:

It’s not to discourage or dissuade anyone from writing about what they’re passionate about or taking a side project. But it’s also important to keep your editor’s priorities in mind.

You should also be open to being mentored by your supervisor or colleagues. Don’t just listen to your boss, really take in and implement what they are trying to teach you. Mandy Stadtmiller, deputy editor of xoJane, appreciates when she sees her suggestions being used:

I really notice when someone actually takes action and doesn’t just say, ‘Oh, thanks for the good advice.’

For more internship tips from editors, read: 8 Ways to Succeed at an Editorial Internship.

 

Survey Shows How Social Media Packs a Punch in Hiring

new_twitter_logoIf you’re scanning your Twitter and Facebook profiles right now to see if anything is potentially harmful, you’re making the right move.

That’s because a new survey conducted by CareerBuilder discovered 51 percent of employers who have researched job candidates actually found content that caused them to not hire the candidate. This is up from last year’s findings of 43 percent and from 2012′s results of 34 percent. Read more

What’s Protocol for Flying With Your Boss?

globeSilently nod with us in agreement if you board a flight and slip on those earphones even though you may not even be spinning tunes on the other end. The goal? Of course, to block out chatty neighbors.

Well, when your boss is flying in the seat next to you on an international flight, the protocol is a bit more formal and professional. According to a piece in today’s New York Post, it’s important to follow your boss’ lead. Read more

Founders of UCB Suggest Improv Basics to Rock Your Next Job Interview

UCBIf you’ve ever been stumped during a job interview or had an awkward moment of silence, you’re not alone.

So if you want to turn those lengthy moments into gems, the founders of Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre suggest relying on some basic improv techniques to boost your game.

On Friday we conducted exclusive interviews with two of the four founders, Ian Roberts and Matt Besser, at the annual UCB Del Close Marathon. Not surprisingly, the marathon’s press conference kicked off with a ton of energy and excitement and moments after it concluded, Roberts and Besser talked about thepower of “yes, and.” Read more

Three Ways to Botch a Job Interview

job searchHave you ever tried to wing it during a job interview? How’d that go for you? Not too well, probably.

Well, according to Marc Cosentino, author of Case In Point: Complete Case Interview Preparation, there are a few common blunders people make during job interviews.

Per a piece on Business Insider, he pointed out several ways to avoid being that guy or gal. Read more

Monster Survey Shows Millennials Experience Burnout More Than Others

stressIf you’re stressed out, raise your hand! Yes, we all get burned out at one point or another but when it comes to specific generations, Millennials experience burnout the most.

According to a new survey conducted by Monster Worldwide, Inc., 86 percent of Millennial respondents reveal some level of burnout in their current jobs. This is in comparison to 76 percent of more experienced workouts indicating burnout in their roles. Sidebar: Those numbers seem awfully high, don’t they? Are we working ourselves to the ground? That’s a whole other blog post but still, it makes you think… Read more

Until Our Education Changes, Journalists Can’t Be One-Man Bands

MediaIntern2Technology has made it possible to produce an entire article from the palm of your hand with a click-worthy headline and tweetable content. Countless professionals have continually told me that my (millennial) generation can’t specialize in just one particular medium anymore like professionals did 20 years ago. We’re supposed to be one-man bands.

This is a little troubling for me. While I love writing and photography, my talents as a videographer aren’t as strong as I’d like them to be. Recent journalism graduates and current students don’t always have the time or opportunity to learn different technologies and specialties while in school. A lot of schools are struggling with trying to integrate these lessons into their curricula, so those of us with freshly earned bachelor’s degrees are scrambling to pick up extra skills in our spare time.

It’s a multimedia world, so by the time graduation rolls around students’ resumes should include skills in photography, videography, Photoshop, Soundslides, html coding and more. The problem isn’t that we aren’t willing to learn all of these skills; it’s that these courses can’t be squeezed into a mere four years of college. And journalism jobs often don’t pay enough for the extra cost of attending graduate school to further our education. My school had one photojournalism class and one multimedia journalism class that was only started a couple of years ago. The rest of the courses I was expected to take were on different writing styles, principles and ethics. Photoshop was a class meant for those in advertising and marketing. Videography was for the film majors, photography for the fine arts majors, and coding for all seven of the computer science majors.

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