Quora has lifted its ban on “self-promoting questions and answers,” potentially opening the door to another way for marketers and PR firms to spread the word about their clients.

Late last week, Quora’s Marc Bodnick announced the old ban was “problematic” and would be eliminated as of Thursday.

“Quora’s key principle regarding content is that users should make the site a great resource for people who want to learn,” he wrote. “The quality of the answer is what we care about. Evaluating the intention of an answer does not support this policy. We want to encourage users to provide answers based on personal experience, and this often involves — or even requires — discussing subject(s) in which the writer has personal experience. Personal experience is an asset, not a liability, and is a key element of many of the best answers on Quora. In other words, we want users to write about what they know and care about — companies, organizations, causes, people, products, etc.”

Still required: disclosure. And Quora’s voting system, which can bury useless posts under real answers, will help eliminate much of the spam, Bodnick said.

Quite honestly, to assume that until Thursday the only people answering questions were completely disinterested third parties with no agenda would be pretty naive. This is more honest, we think.