TVNewser Jobs PRNewser Jobs AgencySpy Jobs SocialTimes Jobs

Posts Tagged ‘Freelance’

Study Shows Majority of Employers Not Prepared for Future Objectives

workplace bullyHappy Friday one and all! Thanks for being here. As you know from our posts, we try to be upbeat! Optimistic! Insightful!

But alas, we need to call it like we see it and this new study by Oxford Economics and SAP is a prime example. In fact, just yesterday SAP released it during their SuccessConnect conference.

They surveyed 2,700 executives and 2,700 employees worldwide and discovered two-thirds of businesses will not have made strides in order to build a workforce to meet their future business objectives. Two-thirds!

The main culprit? Misunderstandings between management and employees regarding workplace priorities. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 left off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

How to Make the Most of a Gap Year

suitcaseIf you think taking a gap year is just for high school kids before they jaunt off to college, think again.

According to the Brazen Careerist, experienced professionals have blazed a trail well into their careers and they’ve done it on small budgets to boot.

For starters, you should look into your employer’s sabbatical policy. If you’ve already been at your employer for a few years, you may qualify for a sabbatical. Another option entails taking an unpaid leave of absence in exchange for a guaranteed job when you return home.
Read more

Calling All Freelancers! New Site Connects Independent Contractors With Available Desks

video interviewIf you are working from home right now, you’re not alone. Well, technically you are alone but countless freelancers are doing it, too. How about a coffee shop? The local library? Our options are endless but when it comes to finding coworking space in an actual office, things can get expensive.

According to a piece by The New York Post, a new site has launched to connect freelancers with open desks. Consider deskcamping like Airbnb for freelance folks. It was launched in December and offers something a bit more unique for freelancers. Instead of having to rent office space by the month, the site lets companies rent free desks by the week or even by the day. Read more

Decrease in Number of Self-Employed Workers Since Recession

LifeAsFreelancerAccording to a new survey conducted by CareerBuilder, self-employment grew tremendously between 2001 and 2006 but has been on the decline lately.

There are approximately 10 million self-employed jobs in our country representing 6.6 percent of all jobs but that number is down from 7.2 percent in 2006. Read more

Three Keys to Starting a Side Gig While Working Full-Time

happy signWho wants to make more money and brand yourself separately from your day job? The question is more like who doesn’t want to do that, right?

According to a post on Forbes, there are a few key ways to effectively start your passion project on the side.  Whether you’re looking for happiness and satisfaction or extra cash rolling in or all of the above, it’s all good.

Per the post, Kimberly Palmer, author of The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life, dished three important tips. Read more

Six Business Lessons for Freelancers

LifeAsFreelancerWhen we read this piece on Forbes, we nodded in agreement.

After all, why should freelancers learn these lessons the hard way when they points have been outlined for us? ShortStack asked their Facebook fans, “What is one business lesson you learned the hard way?”

And away we go…here are their answers, as per ShortStack’s CEO Jim Belosic.

1. You can’t do it all on your own. If you’re setting up shop as a freelancer and creating your own site, social media accounts, the works, chances are you’ll get burned out. Fast. Belosic points out, “Building a team is essential because there are only so many hours one person can devote to a business.”

2. Do one thing incredibly well. As a freelancer, you’re an entrepreneur wearing many hats. If you’re a generalist, will that hurt your chances as a writer compared to say, specializing in financial markets? The piece suggests specializing and then providing a skill or service that makes your core even better. Read more

Three Steps to Make a Killing as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerWe all know that being a freelance writer is an unpredictable career, filled with many monetary ups and downs. Although writing isn’t typically considered a six-figure career, it most definitely can be.

Our latest Mediabistro feature highlights three steps freelancers should take in order to earn a major paycheck this year. The first (and some would argue, most important) step: plan in advance.

The key to an effective income earning strategy, says Kelly James-Enger, a 17-year veteran freelancer, is to focus efforts on what you can control and to stop stressing about what you can’t. “You can’t control how many assignments you get, but you can control how many pitches you’ll send out each week,” she said. “Even if you haven’t seen those [pitches] turn into [an assignment], you know that you’ve met [your] goals. And there’s plenty of research that shows that meeting goals makes you more confident and spurs you on to meet more goals.”

For more tips, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Networking Is Key to Being a Successful Freelance Travel Writer

Travel WritingTravel writing as a genre stirs up plenty of emotion in people. Let’s be honest, it’s mostly jealousy. Getting paid to travel the world sounds like a pretty sweet deal, and it is… and isn’t. The reality of life as a freelance travel writer isn’t as glamorous as it’s made out to be. You’re constantly hustling to find work and it can be stressful at times.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, a freelance travel writer discusses the ups and downs of following her passion. One thing’s for sure: networking helped her land work:

Networking continues to be key, as with any profession. I’ve found that travel writers and bloggers are a strong community, and many of us introduce our colleagues to editors we work with if the fit is right. I’ve had the opportunity to write for a large daily newspaper, thanks in large part to a fellow writer I met on a press trip. And don’t forget to use social media for connections. I recently e-introduced myself to a new editor and her publication I’d read about on Twitter and made a few pitches I thought would be a fit — we’re now in conversation about assignments. It’s all about making the right pitch!

To hear more tips on how to cultivate your travel writing career, read: Embarking on My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

A Freelance Web Designer Turned CEO Explains His Road To Success

GabrielShaoolianGabriel Shaoolian‘s success story is at once familiar and entirely unique. He moved to NYC in 2001 and set up his business with nothing but a laptop and some web design experience. Since then, his company, Blue Fountain Media, has generated over $2 billion in revenue by building sites for everyone from AT&T to AOL.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s Hey, How’d You Do That?, Shaoolian talks about how he went from a freelance web designer to CEO:

Describe the early days of your freelance life.
Well, let me tell you, and I’ll tell anyone out there. It’s crazy. You know, doing this without funding, you lose a lot of sleep, and you lose your life, really. The company becomes your life. It’s not easy. It’s not for someone who wants weekends and who wants vacations. I tell people that you go on vacation and you are still thinking about work every second of every day.

I had no idea what I was in for. I just wanted to build something small. But I realized that I can’t do everything on my own. If I want to do good work, I need team members that are specialized. As Blue Fountain Media grew, I started working on an infrastructure for the company.

To hear more about Shaoolian’s career, as well as his advice for freelancers and entrepreneurs, read: Hey, How’d You Build Profitable Websites For Brands Like AOL and AT&T, Gabriel Shaoolian?

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How Adopting A Uniform Could Help Your Freelance Career

MinimalismFreelancers who work from home understand the need to minimize better than most. When you’re constantly surrounded by your own junk, the endless distractions can become paralyzing and your work may suffer as a result.

So how can freelancers create a minimalist lifestyle? One of the easiest things to do is to adopt a daily uniform. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one freelancer shares her story about how simplifying her life helped her writing:

I love a comfortable, practical pajama as much as the next freelancer, but I’ve found that having a set uniform has two powerful results: First, I don’t waste any time deciding what to wear. I grab one of two black shirts, and one of my two pairs of pants. I don’t have to rifle through hanger after hanger in my closet, because I’ve whittled down my wardrobe to about 20 items — shoes included, gender stereotypes be damned. And because I wear my uniform during work hours, I get the satisfaction of changing into my beloved sweatpants at the end of the day. The other result of my simplified wardrobe is that I take myself seriously. If those in offices are told to dress for the job they’re striving to have, where does that leave freelancers?

For more on how this writer simplified mind and matter, read: The Minimalist Freelance Life.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

NEXT PAGE >>