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Posts Tagged ‘freelance tips’

Whip Your Website Into Shape to Improve Your Pitch Acceptance Rates

Professional-website-articleIf you’re a freelance writer, you probably link to your personal website in your email signature and social media profile pages. Your site may be a blog on a hosted domain, a page you haven’t updated in months, or it may be a well-executed window to who you are as a writer.

When sending out  pitches, your website can be a make-or-break factor for editors deciding whether to give your story the go-ahead. Establish your trustworthiness and showcase your best work with a professional, well-designed site.

[Carol Tice, freelance writer and founder of several web resources for writers] highlights four main components of a killer website: a homepage, an “About” page, contact info, clips and testimonials. The homepage should clearly and concisely state what you do and how you can help your client, while your About page can delve into the work you’ve done recently. “A lot of people’s About pages start, ‘I first knew I wanted to be a writer when I was five years old.’” Tice says. “This is not what the client wants to know about you — they want to know, ‘Who have you been writing for lately?’”

For more tips, read: How to Create a Writer’s Website That Gets You Work.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Rookie Mistakes to Avoid When Freelancing

rookie freelancingFreelance writing: a quick and easy way to write about whatever you want, for whoever you want — all from the comfort of your own home.

If you think the statement above is accurate, prepare yourself for a big shock. Like any job, freelancing has both its pros and cons. In the latest Mediabistro feature, we talk to veteran freelancers to find out how they manage the trials of the freelancing life:

The worst thing you can do, in my opinion, is send a sloppy pitch letter or poorly edited piece to your dream publication. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t challenge yourself to pitch venerated publications, especially if you’re very familiar with what they publish. But it’s much easier to build your body of work, get some help editing your pitch or story and then submit to The New Yorker than to fire off a submission at two in the morning on a wine-induced whim. Create a strong first impression rather than spending time and energy recovering from a bad one.

For more researching tips and organizing ideas, read The Rookie Guide to Freelancing.
Sherry Yuan

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

6 Tips for Landing Repeat Writing Assignments

As Sara Horowitz, founder of the Freelancers Union, once said, “One of the challenges for all freelancers, though, is it can be feast or famine.” Sometimes you could be raking in the assignments; at others, editors could be strangely silent when you want to hear from them the most.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, magazine veterans give tips on how to foster your relationships with editors to keep the assignments, and the paychecks, rolling in.

Read more in 6 Tips for Landing Repeat Writing Assignments.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Set Your Freelance Rates

Being a freelancer comes with many perks: working from home, flexible hours and the ability to pick your own projects. But it can be difficult to figure out how much your work is worth. Should you have an hourly rate or a per-project one? New writers might want to accept a lower rate to build clips, but how do you know when a rate is too low? Is the project even worth your time?

In the latest Mediabistro feature, seasoned freelancers share their experiences, so you can learn from their mistakes and maximize the value of your work.

Freelancer Aubre Andrus says she set a salary goal for herself and calculates her hourly rate from there. For her, the fact that she isn’t working on income-generating tasks 40 hours a week was a determining factor.

“This rate helps me devise my per-project fee and helps me decide if a project is worth my time,” explained Andrus. That, along with tracking her monthly earnings, has helped her stay on target to attain her salary goal.

Read more in 4 Things to Consider When Setting Your Freelance Writing Rate. [subscription required]