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Posts Tagged ‘Lindsay Olson’

Want to Impress a Hiring Manager? New Survey Reveals They Applaud Personal Web Sites

According to a new study by Workfolio, more than half of the hiring managers surveyed are more impressed by a personal Web site than other branding tools.

As pointed out by a post on U.S. News & World Report, Charles Pooley, the founder and CEO of Workfolio indicated a few things are musts to include on a personal site: Your interests, a photo, your career results and achievements and a short bio.

As for social media, you can include links to platforms you’re active with but try to only include ones that are relevant to the job.

Lindsay Olson wrote in the piece, “You can also show off your expertise by including blog posts on topics that relate to the field you work in, or want to work in. Even if you don’t have a ton of job experience, well-written and well-informed copy can go a long way in impressing a potential employer.” Read more

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The Case For Not Giving Two Weeks Notice

Have you ever wanted to march right into your boss’ office without a contingency plan and simply burst out by saying you’re quitting?

Well, we’ve all been there but at this point we pretty much know it’s not a prudent thing to do.

Sure, you should line up another job and give at least two weeks notice in order to not burn any bridges. Plus, it’s courteous to your colleagues in addition to your employer to not bail all of the sudden. In fact, some people may give three or even four weeks if they’re in the middle of major deadlines.

But alas, there’s always a situation or two where you want out and you want out now. Or maybe your new employer has an aggresive start date in mind and you can’t wait to move forward and not look back. Read more

Five Ways to Manage Workplace Friendships

Ah, workplace friendships. We know them all too well. You spend every waking hour of every work day with your cubicle mates and chat at the water cooler so at some point the lines between friends and co-workers may begin to look a little bit blurry.

According to Lindsay Olson, blogger at U.S. News & World Report, it’s important to keep your business and personal lives separate. She writes in the piece, “Keep your personal chat reserved for your breaks and after work. You want your other co-workers to still take you seriously as a professional, and getting too chummy on the job might get in the way.”

Next, it’s important to go slow. Trust is a big factor here and for a friendship to blossom and work out outside the office, you’ll need to slowly let the other person into your life. Need proof? She writes, “So you don’t want to embarrass yourself (i.e., going overboard on Tequila Tuesdays) or reveal too much about your personal life (maybe you’re thinking about a career change) and have it come back to bite you.”

Although it’s rewarding to forge friendships at the office and certainly infuses the day with more fun, it’s important to remember why you’re there. As in the whole paycheck thing. Don’t let friendships thwart you from focusing on the job, your numero uno goal of each day.

As hard as it may be too resist, one of the ultimate ways to maintain boundaries is to resist complaining about your boss. In the piece she writes, “It’s almost a natural instinct to complain about work to a friend, but realize that a workplace friend makes that a treacherous path to travel. If he or she is friends with or connected to your boss, your venting may cause problems for you in your department.”

Negativity never serves any good anyway, especially if you end up transferring to another department or it gets out of hand. Just like gossip.

Lastly, it’s important to keep boundaries intact. Not all friendships work out (similar to how budding office romances may fizzle); remaining focused on your work situation will instill much needed distance between you and your colleague. Her advice? “Socialize with friends outside of work to balance out the time you spend with your work friends.”

Recruiter: ‘We’ve Been Busier Than Ever In 2010′

Over at PRNewser a guest post from Lindsay Olson, a partner and recruiter with Paradigm Staffing, is saying that the job market, at least for PR folks, is picking up. Not just picking up, but really picking up.

She writes:
“If you had asked me in Q4 2009 if I expected 2010 to be a good year for the PR job market, the hesitation in my voice would have clearly shown I wasn’t too hopeful. By the end of January of this year, despite my doubts, I couldn’t even count how many times I’d heard myself saying how good 2010 is going to turn out.”

But you don’t have to take my word for it.