TVNewser Jobs PRNewser Jobs AgencySpy Jobs SocialTimes Jobs

Posts Tagged ‘multitasking’

Three Ways to Become More Mindful at Work

yogaIf you’ve ever been checked out at work, you’re not alone. But when we say checked out we really mean not being engaged when you’re supposed to be. It’s one thing to check out and surf Mediabistro during a conference call but it’s quite another to be zoning when you’re working on deadline.

Dr. Stephen McKenzie’s new book provides pointers to be mindful at work while simultaneously reducing stress to achieve more. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on Janaury 27  at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

It’s Confirmed! Study Shows Multitasking Just Doesn’t Work

multitaskingIf you’re reading this on a tablet while your mobile device is ringing and you’re secretly playing Words With Friends on your laptop, listen up.

According to a new study published in the journal Human Factors, multitasking is simply not effective. Here’s why: The average office worker is apparently interrupted six times an hour (six times!) and in turn, interruptions severely impact the ability to produce quality work. Read more

Author of ‘Overwhelmed’ Says Multitasking Isn’t a Good Idea

stressHave you ever felt like you are having a productive day by juggling countless deadlines, only to feel at the end of the day like nothing got done?

Meet Brigid Schulte, author of Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. According to her interview with The New York Post, she says a lot of people may be shocked to hear this, particularly women

“When we’re multitasking we tend to reward ourselves with, “Woo, look how much I’m doing!” But studies find that your brain literally cannot pay attention to two things at the same time with equal weight. You’re not giving either thing your full attention. So instead of doing one thing well, you’re doing two things poorly.”

Sometimes when you’re caught up in working crazy hours, you may not even notice you’re in the thick of it. For Schulte, that “A-ha!” moment came when she was reporting a story and a time researcher told her she had 30 hours of leisure a week. The author “just didn’t realize it.” Read more

Four Things to Stop Doing Immediately at Work

Want to boost your productivity and have peace of mind? As per this piece on Inc.com, there are a few things we should all stop doing immediately.

Jeff Haden writes in the piece, “If you get decent value from making to-do lists, you’ll get huge returns–in productivity, in improved relationships, and in your personal well-being–from adding these items to your not to-do list.”

1. Check your phone while you’re talking to someone. Not only is it rude (and yes, we can tell when you’re peeking), it’s distracting and a really transparent way to let the other person know you don’t care about what they’re saying.

He points out, “Stop checking your phone. It doesn’t notice when you aren’t paying attention. Other people? They notice. And they care.”

2. Multitask during a meeting. Again, it boils down to paying attention. Plus, you can actually learn a lot and retain information if you’re not zipping through your mobile phone. You can hone those soft skills and find opportunities to make connections and small talk.

3. Use multiple notifications. Here’s a hint: Turn it off. We shouldn’t have the immediate need to know when we receive a text message, tweet or e-mail. “If something is important enough for you to do, it’s important enough for you to do without interruptions. Focus totally on what you’re doing. Then, on a schedule you set–instead of a schedule you let everyone else set–play prairie dog and pop your head up to see what’s happening.”

4. Talk behind someone’s back. Just say no. And if you end up getting sucked into office gossip, rest assured your cronies may end up talking behind your back as well. Delete this from your repertoire and focus your time on productive conversations instead.