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Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

How To Be A Successful Writer

Terry McMillan has had the kind of success most aspiring writers only dream of. After two semi-successful first novels, McMillan hit the jackpot with her 1992 classic Waiting to Exhale, which remained on the New York Times Bestseller list for more than nine months and cemented her status as the queen of contemporary African American literature. She went on to write five more acclaimed novels and served as screenwriter/executive producer on three films based on her work (How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Disappearing Acts and Waiting to Exhale). In the latest installment of So What Do You Do?, she tells Mediabistro how she creates unforgettable characters and why up-and-coming writers truly need to love the craft:

You’ve had such a long and successful career, what advice do you have for a new writer who wants to break into the industry and have the kind of longevity that you’ve had?
Well, I think first and foremost, they don’t need to think of it that way. I think that’s a big mistake. Do you think when I wrote my first book, Mama, in 1987, that I was thinking, “Oh, I want to have a long writing career?” No. This is not a job. It’s not that. [Writing is] not a career to me. It’s what I do. And to me there’s a difference, you know? But I would suggest that young writers take the craft very seriously [and] not worry about fame. But read. Everything. And I do mean everything. Take some writing classes. And they’ll know if this is what they really are compelled to do. But it shouldn’t be an ambition. “I want to be a famous writer;” “I want to be a bestselling author.” Those are the wrong reasons for doing this. And if those are your motives, chances are it won’t happen.

To get more advice from McMillan, read So What Do You Do, Terry McMillan, New York Times Best Selling Author?

–Aneya Fernando

Mediabistro Course Social Media 101

Get hands-on social media training for beginners in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Hurry, this boot camp starts next week! Register now!

The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

David Carr: My First Big Break

In the latest episode of mediabistroTV’s “My First Big Break,” New York Times columnist, and journalist’s journalist, David Carr remembers the first big story of his career.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Bartenders Start Tweeting While New York Times Magazine Finds its New Editor, Plus Other News of the Day

- Well it’s over, and it only seems like yesterday when we first began talking about the potential suitors for Newsweek. Actually, scratch that. Finally, the transition is over! The Washington Post Co. officially handed Sidney Harman the keys to Newsweek today. But the company didn’t announce how much it received for the magazine. Now we will start to see the real changes as rumors of a Daily Beast partnership continue to circle the troubled weekly.

- New York Times magazine finally got its next top editor. But it’s not who most people expected. They brought on Bloomberg Businessweek‘s executive editor Hugo Lindgren, who has spent time at the Times Magazine, as well as New York magazine. But check out this internal memo from NYT executive editor Bill Keller. He actually uses a non-attributed quote to say why they hired Lindgren. “‘He’s very smart, wildly creative and charismatic,’” says one editor who has worked closely with him. ‘People like him and want to do their best work for him. He just has a great magazine head.’” What? They couldn’t get anyone on record?

- All right, enough already, National Journal. We get it, you want to hire top talent, but does it have to be everyday? Now they brought on Newsweek senior editor Adam Kushner to take over as deputy magazine editor. “Adam will inject rigor and discipline to our analyses, ensuring that our reporters seize the heart of every story and not its capillaries,” said National Journal Group Editor-in-Chief Ron Fournier in a press release. “Under his guidance, National Journal readers won’t be left asking, ‘So what? Why does this matter?’ They’ll know what happened in Washington and why it’s relevant to their lives and work.” OK, are you all done already?

- It seems everyone needs to know social media these days, and if you’re in Chicago that includes bartenders. The Awl found this job listing for a bartender in Chicago that is an “established networker both in person and through social media.” Really, they need a bartender with a thousand Twitter followers? I’m not sure I want my bartender tweeting, but I guess that could just be me.

Diller Likes AOL While National Journal’s Latest Hire Talks Decline, Plus Other News of the Day

- Well the Wall Street Journal is sure enjoying a recent jump in its advertising revenue, and it wants to make it clear that the New York Times isn’t matching it. According to a company memo obtained by Romenesko, the WSJ‘s print and online revenue jumped 17%, while its digital advertising revenue skyrocketed up 29% in the first quarter of 2011. How’s NYT‘s? According to the memo, “for the same three month period the New York Times has forecast total print and online revenue for its calendar third quarter to fall 2 to 3% compared with a year before. Total print advertising revenue is expected to be down 5%. Total digital advertising revenue is projected to rise 14%.” Does this mean the WSJ is winning?

- AOL has one fan in IAC CEO Barry Diller. Of course this fan was speaking at AOL’s recent acquisition, TechCrunch’s conference when he spoke of AOL. “For the first time in more than ten years … which in an internet company of such size is an eternity … real things are happening,” said Diller, according to paidContent. “There is a real direction, a real plan, it is under a real leader. It is independent, it’s got a real chance.” What are Diller’s thoughts on Yahoo, however? He didn’t want to talk about it.

- The media watchdog group Free Press has filed a complaint to the Federal Communications Commission to stop the practice of paid publicists supporting products on television news casts, when the news station presents the person as a consumer advocate. This move by the Free Press has come on the heels of Los Angeles Times columnist James Rainey calling out the FCC for not doing something about this practice. “The agency hopes the threat of public embarrassment will keep hucksters in check,” wrote Rainey. “Judging from my reporting on toy woman Werner, I’m not so sure. Several PR professionals told me they see secretly paid promotions only growing…. Television stations won licenses from the FCC with promises to uphold a trust to serve the public interest. Critical in that trust is helping the audience understand where content comes from.” Wonder how the FCC will react to that.

- It’s a continuing theme of this nightly roundup, but National Journal picked up another hire today. Boston.com’s editor David Beard will join the publication as its deputy editor-in-chief and online editor. But Beard had some thoughts about what he does and the old media world as he left. “I thought about the first Times owner…and how much he really dreamed up new ideas and thought like an entrepreneur — as opposed to a manager of an extant company,” said Beard to Nieman Journalism Lab. “I didn’t want to live my life managing decline.” That’s a sad, but poignant statement.

Outgoing Slate Writer: “People Rarely Leave”

After eight years, Slate writer Daniel Gross has decided to try a new venture as a columnist for Yahoo Finance. But as he departed, he wrote quite the exit post. It’s not odd in that he reminisces about his time at Slate, but in how much he praises the online magazine.

The writers who held down this column before me handed over a great audience in the summer of 2002. Excellent editors, careful copy editors, and brilliant illustrators improved my work greatly.

Gross goes on to comment about the media at large. While his comments refer to Slate, it shows just how much the balance of power has shifted to the online world and the companies that have taken advantage of that change.

Slate has become one of those places that people rarely leave. That’s partly because the New York Times lacks the resources to poach Slate staffers as it did in the old days. But it’s largely because few places offer the combination of freedom, reach, prestige, playfulness, collegiality, and the ability to experiment. Slate combines many of the best qualities of the new media world and the old. It’s a place where good writing and writers still matter.

Now that’s an exit interview HR folks love to hear.

PR Firm Hires Director Of Social Media

Did you ever think social media would become such a large entity in our lives that companies would start hiring employees just to oversee their representation on it? Well, that’s just what’s happening.

Robin Leedy & Associates Public Relations just announced the hiring of Christian Brucculeri as their Director of Social Media. Most recently Christian was a senior account director for YouCast Coproration, where he developed and launched successful social media marketing campaigns for and Pepsi, Pandora Radio, KFC, Triaminic, Sony, Warner Bros. Entertainment and others. Prior to this he served as the director of Artist Management for Zen Media Group.

From the press release:

While social/digital media has been an important element of campaigns targeting younger audiences, according to the New York Times (February 23, 2009), more than 60 percent of baby boomers are now avid consumers of social media, such as blogs, forums, podcasts and online video, up from roughly 40 percent a year ago. “Younger people have been heavy social and digital media users for some time, getting much of their news and information via the Internet, but now virtually all age groups are quickly catching up and can no longer be forgotten in the digital/social media mix,” says Brucculeri, who has worked on digital campaigns for Macy’s, Schick, Energizer and Snapple.

“Bringing Christian onboard at RL&A is extremely exciting for us as we continue to strengthen our digital offerings,” says Robin Russo, RL&A president. “Social media and its adaptable messaging clearly belongs under the PR umbrella, and Christian’s hands-on, creative background will greatly enhance both the breadth and effectiveness of the digital programming we offer to our clients.”

This exciting news represents a larger expansion for traditional companies into the digital world.