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Posts Tagged ‘writing’

How Adopting A Uniform Could Help Your Freelance Career

MinimalismFreelancers who work from home understand the need to minimize better than most. When you’re constantly surrounded by your own junk, the endless distractions can become paralyzing and your work may suffer as a result.

So how can freelancers create a minimalist lifestyle? One of the easiest things to do is to adopt a daily uniform. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one freelancer shares her story about how simplifying her life helped her writing:

I love a comfortable, practical pajama as much as the next freelancer, but I’ve found that having a set uniform has two powerful results: First, I don’t waste any time deciding what to wear. I grab one of two black shirts, and one of my two pairs of pants. I don’t have to rifle through hanger after hanger in my closet, because I’ve whittled down my wardrobe to about 20 items — shoes included, gender stereotypes be damned. And because I wear my uniform during work hours, I get the satisfaction of changing into my beloved sweatpants at the end of the day. The other result of my simplified wardrobe is that I take myself seriously. If those in offices are told to dress for the job they’re striving to have, where does that leave freelancers?

For more on how this writer simplified mind and matter, read: The Minimalist Freelance Life.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Mediabistro Course Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

Develop a plan for your book’s success in our brand new online boot camp, Book Promotion and Publicity! Starting July 10, publishing and public relations experts will teach you the publicity skills needed to ensure a successful book launch, such as, how to create a social media kit, interact with fans and authors on panels, create a marketing newsletter and more! Register now!

The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

How To Hone Your Specialty As A Freelance Writer

specializingHaving a specialty as writer is a huge advantage in the cutthroat world of freelancing. It can help distinguish you from you peers and create new work opportunities for you to showcase your skills.

Establishing your expertise is key to developing your reputation. It’s also important to make sure the community is aware of your work. Veteran freelancers agree that in order to do that, networking with other writers is key:

Getting your name and face out into the world can be intimidating, but you don’t have to reinvent the wheel to do it. Start by having your byline out there, Rae Francoeur operater of the New Arts Collaborative suggests. Also, consider writer’s conferences, book expos and blog conventions. Camilla McLaughlin, a real estate writer, connects with local editors and homeowners and attends trade shows to keep her finger on the pulse of real estate.

To hear more tips on how to enhance your writing career, including when you should decline a gig, read: Growing Your Writing Career By Becoming A Specialist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How To Be A Successful Writer

Terry McMillan has had the kind of success most aspiring writers only dream of. After two semi-successful first novels, McMillan hit the jackpot with her 1992 classic Waiting to Exhale, which remained on the New York Times Bestseller list for more than nine months and cemented her status as the queen of contemporary African American literature. She went on to write five more acclaimed novels and served as screenwriter/executive producer on three films based on her work (How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Disappearing Acts and Waiting to Exhale). In the latest installment of So What Do You Do?, she tells Mediabistro how she creates unforgettable characters and why up-and-coming writers truly need to love the craft:

You’ve had such a long and successful career, what advice do you have for a new writer who wants to break into the industry and have the kind of longevity that you’ve had?
Well, I think first and foremost, they don’t need to think of it that way. I think that’s a big mistake. Do you think when I wrote my first book, Mama, in 1987, that I was thinking, “Oh, I want to have a long writing career?” No. This is not a job. It’s not that. [Writing is] not a career to me. It’s what I do. And to me there’s a difference, you know? But I would suggest that young writers take the craft very seriously [and] not worry about fame. But read. Everything. And I do mean everything. Take some writing classes. And they’ll know if this is what they really are compelled to do. But it shouldn’t be an ambition. “I want to be a famous writer;” “I want to be a bestselling author.” Those are the wrong reasons for doing this. And if those are your motives, chances are it won’t happen.

To get more advice from McMillan, read So What Do You Do, Terry McMillan, New York Times Best Selling Author?

–Aneya Fernando