With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, this piece may be right up your alley. That is, how can you put the spark back into your job presuming it may be a bit monotonous right now? Considering you may pour your heart and soul into your job upwards of 50, 60 or even 70 (or more!) hours per week, you might as well enjoy it, right?

Well, what if the office, commute, co-workers, deadlines, all of the above, seem to be getting stale? First, you need to recognize it’s time to rekindle your passion and create it if it’s gone. According to a piece on U.S. News & World Report, there are a few ways to accomplish this.

1. Think long term goals. Have you ever gotten so caught up in the present, as in a deadline by COB, that you’re missing the big picture? No worries, it happens to all of us but we may lose sight of our career path, our next big gig, our next big “get.” If your job right now isn’t ideal, it’s probably giving you the opportunity to at least prepare for your next job.

Think about your next job and how you’re going to get it. In the piece, Ritika Trikha writes, “Start doing some research about what your next step forward will be in your career trajectory. Create opportunity for growth—even if it means searching for a job elsewhere. Once the wheels are in motion, you will start feeling re-energized about your career goals.”

2. Take on a new challenge. Ain’t this the truth? Spike thing up! Simply talk to your performance manager and ask to take on a new project. Maybe it means collaborating with another department and consequently expanding your skill set and network.  Maybe it’s asking for feedback on how to improve your current job.

Shake up that boring routine, okay? As soon as you’ve identified one or two ways to improve or one or two projects, you can set your sights on accomplishing that goal.

3. Write down the highlights. One of the best things to do when you’re in a rut is writing things down in the positive. If you’re a freelancer, maybe you landed a brand new client. Perhaps you received recognition at a luncheon or met a deadline with several hours to spare.

Trikha advises, “Write about how you did it in one or two sentences on a piece of scrap paper. Fold the piece of paper and put it in a jar. After you’ve collected a nice handful of notes, randomly pick a couple out and you’ll love walking down happy memory lane.”