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Media Jobs Monthly Newsletter

September 30, 2009
So, what's your strategy for that next hire -- a "boomerang?" "Cut and paste?" "Palm or iPhone?" It seems that when the things we do, like sourcing talent, undergo a lot of change and are subject to a lot of newness, we are forced to come up with fresh terminology to try and neatly capture the complexity of things. And it really isn't about technology or the need to have quirky names for the latest gadgets. The complexity we are all encountering is in varying behaviors and relationships between employer and employed. Yes, the game is changing.

It's astounding that perhaps as many as 18 percent of laid-off workers are being hired back by their former employers. Were all those layoffs a bout of overreaction? Panic? Or is it just that those employers realized that, even in tight times, proven talent is hard to find. It's better to bring back the tried-and-true than to let the competition take advantage of the situation with a little "countercyclical hiring." However, if you cannot hire your old employee back, do you do the next closest thing and just "copy and paste" someone with the same title and industry experience, or instead start with a blank sheet and really try to nail what the company needs in terms of talent?

Often what media companies need more of are employees who have flexibility in their skills and abilities: employees who can (and will!) do more, do different stuff, and do things we haven't even imagined yet. Do these people exist? Yes! If you have any doubt, just watch Gary Vaynerchuk of Wine Library TV "crush" the what and how of social media. As Gary so sharply points out, the changes we are experiencing are not because of Twitter or blogs. They are just "tape" and "markers" -- tools. How to use them is the key to success. Regardless of how you choose to describe this new world, the rules of the game are indeed changing. Are you ready to play?

Bill Conneely,
Director, Job Market


Still Considering Furloughs? Check Here First (Compensation Force)
The Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division has some answers to FAQs about what happens when your company implements a mandatory furlough.

Are Your Candidates Palms or iPhones? (Fistful of Talent)
The Palm Pre has technical wizardry that surpasses even the iPhone, but the iPhone has apps. Similarly, Paul Hebert contends that candidates with ample skills but few connections will never dominate the phone marketplace -- er, bring the most value to your company.

Best Practices in Re-Recruiting Top Talent (Bersin)
Eighteen percent of laid-off workers are being hired back by their former companies, meaning that "boomerang" employees are more than a buzzword. Should you be looking toward alumni for talent?

A Tighter Rein on HR Blogging? (Workforce)
Will HR bloggers remain renegades in the face of federal regulations, or is self-policing enough? Workforce explores the state of the HR blogosphere. (One response: "This high-pitched squeal of disdain is never louder than from the gasping mouths of some of our industry's traditional media.")

Four Ways to Get Your Candidate Sourcing Mojo Going -- Even If You Have No Time (Fistful of Talent)
"Set aside some practice time. Not a lot, just 15 minutes every morning, if you're feeling generous, go for 30. Book it in Outlook and give yourself a mission," says Kelly Dingee. "Maybe it's to see how many different keywords you can generate for one of your requisitions... Or maybe it's creating a bunch of search strings in a Google document to use the next day, during your next session."

What's Wrong With Copy and Paste Hiring? (The Staffing Advisor)
Recruiters "recruit (copy) a candidate from one company and place (paste) them into another company in the same industry. 'Yup, got one same title, same industry, we have a match,'" notes The Staffing Advisor. "When a recruiter lets a manager get away with that, it's just wrong. Recruiters should know better. Managers should expect more."

Monster's Job Business Isn't Collapsing Anymore! (Silicon Alley Insider)
DeutscheBank analyst Jeetil Patel said that Monster.com is the only one of the three large job boards showing signs of stabilization. Page views for the company's Web site were mostly flat in June and July, compared with declines of 20 percent for Careerbuilder and 60 percent for HotJobs.

Countercyclical Hiring: The Greatest Recruiting Opportunity in the Last 25 Years (ERE.net)
"Any manager who has participated in a significant volume of corporate purchasing negotiations realizes that there are economic and competitive factors that make a particular period the 'perfect time' to get the best deal." Or, as Warren Buffett puts it, if you plan to eat hamburgers your whole life, should you rejoice when the price of beef goes up? Now, when supply is up and demand is down, says John Sullivan, is the greatest time to hire.

Hiring Down 7 Percent for Class of 2010 (NACE)
Despite being cheap and readily available, students in the Class of 2010 won't find jobs as easily as their 2009 counterparts. Employers are planning to trim their college hiring by 7 percent, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers' 2010 Fall Preview survey. Nearly 40 percent of employers said they'd decrease college recruiting; only 17 percent said they would increase hires.

Cash in on Your Passion with Social Media & Personal Branding (Mediabistro Career Circus)
Just watch the preview -- if it doesn't make you want full access, email us and we will buy it for you! He's been on the cover of The New York Times Dining section, but this is the real Gary Vaynerchuk of Wine Library TV. This guy gets social media and talks about it from the gut in a totally honest and "colorful" way.


--Compiled by Rachel Kaufman, editor, MediaJobsDaily.com



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