TVNewser Jobs PRNewser Jobs AgencySpy Jobs SocialTimes Jobs

Posts Tagged ‘how to’

How Hamish Hamilton Prepares for Live Events: ‘I’ve Learned How To Control My Energy’

HamishHamiltonHamish Hamilton has directed many incredible live events throughout his career. The 2013 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, the Super Bowl XLVII, the 2012 London Olympics — the list goes on…

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Hamilton explains that it’s not all fun and games. He describes the days and months (sometimes years!) it takes to bring these elaborate productions to life, and how he manages to pull it off:

The rehearsal days are intense, long, demanding, physically exhausting, mentally exhausting. You have to make very big decisions quite quickly. I try to get a lot of sleep. It’s crucial to be mentally fit on show day. That said, I normally put in between 14- and 16-hour work days. Having done so many diverse projects, I’ve learned how to control my energy so that I’ve got enough left for the live shows — the last thing you want is to show up to direct a live show being completely and utterly exhausted. That’s really where you need to make lighting-shot decisions.

To hear more about Hamilton’s career, read: So What Do You Do, Hamish Hamilton, Director Of Some Of The World’s Biggest Televised Events?

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Turn Your Boss Into Your Freelance Client With These Tips

Have you always dreamed of ditching the 9-to-5 in favor of being your own boss? Want to take the freelance plunge but the fear the lack of stability? If you needed any further convincing, a McKinsey Global Institute survey found that 58 percent of employers are planning on hiring more independent contractors in the next five years. But don’t go running for the door just yet – the best way to make a smooth transition is to build up your contacts and client list. And what better place to start than your current gig? In the latest Mediabistro feature, workplace experts give tips on how to turn your current boss into a freelance client:

Demonstrate how invaluable your services have been.
“The key is to present a business case to senior management and get their approval,” said Sherri Thomas, president of Career Coaching 360 and author of The Bounce Back. “I recently had a client who… found a business problem that the company needed to solve and she focused all her efforts on becoming an expert in that area to help solve it,” Thomas explained. “Eventually, she became the only person inside the company doing the type of work she was doing. She weighed her options, decided how she could add value to the organization by becoming a contractor, presented her business case to senior leaders and they were sold.” Having already earned the confidence of upper management, you may be better positioned than a replacement colleague assigned to take over your duties because higher ups are saving time and money on training.

For more, read How To Turn Your Boss Into Your Freelance Client.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

7 Mistakes Every Freelancer Should Avoid

freelancer mistakes

Humility is a virtue that shouldn’t be forgotten at any stage, in any profession — including freelance writing.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, veteran freelancers talk about mistakes they made and learned from:

Assuming you’re so brilliant that readers will just fall into your lap.

“Magnum opus to ‘filler article about diaper rash’ writing is 100 percent reader driven,” said editor and writer Suzann Ledbetter Ellingsworth. She reminds new writers that even when professionals speak about how they really only “write for themselves,” they’re usually saying it at a promotional event, with the intention of selling their writing. Truly successful writers write with their audience in mind: Their readers’ needs and wants always come first.

For more veteran tips on navigating the freelance world, read 7 Mistakes Every Freelance Writer Should Avoid.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

What Freelancers Should Do When A Publisher Doesn’t Pay

Money

Paychecks are not meant to be elusive; they’re meant to be in our bank accounts.

Alas, this is often not the case for freelance writers, who may resort to various tactics ranging from gentle prodding to angry shouting, in order to hunt down that check.

Well, what if none of that works? One writer was stiffed on payment for over year, from a pub that she had been consistently writing for. In her case, it took bringing matters to court:

The papers were filed in the morning and an attorney for the magazine called me by early afternoon. I’d since landed another day job, but I’d never given up on getting that money. I worked for it, I earned it and I was never, going to turn down a lump sum of three grand. After all of the time that had elapsed — by now, more than a year since I sent that initial email to my editor — it was just as much about the principle.

To hear the rest of her story, read Lessons in Freelancing: What to Do When Stiffed on Payment

Sherry Yuan
The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.