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Posts Tagged ‘Job searching’

Looking for a Perfect Job? Expert Suggests Looking for a ‘Three and a Half Day Job’ Instead

Ah, the American dream. Make a ton of money and retire young, right? Or in other instances, it’s about having a job you absolutely love.

Well, a Harvard Business Review blog post reminds us about the notion of a perfect job. In other words, keep dreaming. Okay, we shouldn’t be that bleak. There are fantastic jobs out there but the point is to alter your expectations and perceptions to accept reality that even the most stellar opportunity will come with a few drawbacks.

In fact, the all or nothing philosophy doesn’t have to apply. If you’re constantly searching for the absolute best opportunity, you may discover jobs out there are falling short. So, it’s important to adjust your expectations. Read more

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How to Read Between the Lines of a Job Posting

Job seekers should always have their detective hats on: You never know what valuable insights you may glean from a job posting. Scrutinizing the language typically used on job boards can also offer useful information that will help you land and ace an interview. In the latest Mediabistro feature, job experts help you decipher and take advantage of the hidden signs. Check out an excerpt:

What Does “Other Duties as Assigned” Mean?

“Ending job posts with the line ‘other duties as assigned’ often means that the hiring manager doesn’t know exactly what he wants,” said Vance Crowe, CEO of Articulate Ventures, a St. Louis-based communications firm. “But these should be signals to job seekers that management will value your willingness to do the less desirable work.”

So, how do you sell yourself if the hiring manager is flexible about the duties? Get all the advice in How to Read Between the Lines of a Job Posting. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

7 Things Job Seekers Should Include in Social Media Profiles

Social media has revolutionized the way recruiters search for talent, which means job seekers need to make sure their profiles are tuned to perfection. After all, you never know when the right person will stumble across your LinkedIn page at the right time. In the latest Mediabistro feature, career experts and seasoned freelancers tell how to get the most out of social media profiles during the job search. One thing you can include is:

Charity work and professional affiliations

Even if it doesn’t relate to the media biz, fulfilling work you do outside of a paying job can be a great conversation starter. Plus, you never know if the person scoping out your profile knows someone involved in that organization. So, if you spend Sundays tutoring kids at the local community center or helping your child’s PTA organization, include it on your profile.

Likewise, listing professional groups you belong to is a good idea because it builds credibility. (It’s the perfect chance to list those organizations that you pay to belong to just so you can list them on your resume!)

Read more in What Job Seekers Should (and Shouldn’t) Include on Their Social Media Profiles. [subscription required]

5 Ways to Find a Job Before It’s Posted

Submitting as many applications as you can through job boards is one way to land a gig, but the reality is that all jobs don’t magically appear on the Internet. Says freelancer and writing mentor Carol Tice, “In fact, the vast, vast majority of good-paying jobs will never be advertised. Stop waiting to spot them in ads.”

Want to tap into the hidden job market? (You know, those great gigs that haven’t been posted yet?)

Tip No. 1: Contact companies directly.

Amy Phillip, an executive career coach, recommends connecting directly with the person who hires. For journalists, that’s often the editor or managing editor, while it can be the director of marketing for copywriters and bloggers. “Find that person on LinkedIn and send an introduction,” she said.

Read more in How to Find a Job Before It’s Posted. [subscription required]

Back to the Basics: Your Job Search Secret

As in, keeping your job search a secret may be a challenge but it’s well worth it.

We know the situation all too well. You’re done. Burned out and ready to move on, in a rut with nowhere to go. Sure, it may be tempting to commiserate with colleagues but according to a piece published by the Harvard Business Review, it’s wise to resist that temptation.

Regardless of how close you feel you are with coworkers, chances are the best kept secret is simply with yourself. Assume it will be leaked if you’re the one who first leaks it!

Second, as pointed out in the piece, it’s important to conduct stealth networking. Do you really need to tell people outright that you’re looking? Not quite. Instead of being blunt and saying you’re looking for a new job you can tactfully state you’re “open to hearing about new opportunities.” Or that you’re not actively looking but always entertaining your options to see what’s out there.

Lastly, and this is a big one, wait for the offer and wait until you sign on the dotted line to confirm your employment. Only then should you tell your manager you’ve resigned.